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Yesterday I asked this question, and the solution posted by @JB Nizet worked perfectly. However, that answer, as well as a few other answers/comments got me thinking in a different direction altogether.

Essentially, I have the following classes:

  • Load
  • HttpLoad extends Load
  • Target
  • HttpTarget extends Target
  • Controller

The Controller's job is to Target::fire() a Load, and doesn't care which Target is firing which Load:

// Inside Controller.java
Target target = getTarget();
Load load = getLoad();

target.fire(load);

However, I might some day write a FtpLoad extends Load, and I don't want to be able to fire a FtpLoad at an HttpTarget. So the essence of the above-referenced question was how do I do this, to which, the answer was generics.

However, as the answerer pointed out, this solution is a violation of the Liksov Substitution Principle. Other answerer/commenters seemed to indicate that what I was doing wasn't necessarily good OOP practices.

So now I'm asking: how do I expose an API so that the Controller can be Load- and Target-agnostic, but still enforce that the proper Load subclass is fired on the proper Target type, all without violating Liskov Substitution?

And, if this is impossible to do (without violating Liskov), then what is the normal approach to a problem like this? Thanks in advance!

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1  
I call that inheritance-for-templating. Using inheritance because things have a lot of common functionality/attributes but there isn't actually any polymorphic relationship. The "normal" approach is to do it anyway and have clunky APIs full of "supports" methods or similar :) An alternative is encapsulation and multiple dispatch, but people find that hard to understand. –  Affe Sep 21 '12 at 23:23
    
Rule of thumb: overridden methods are almost always violations of Liskov substitutability, because they change the behavior of the subtype when used in place of the supertype. –  Jeffrey Hantin Sep 21 '12 at 23:23
    
Changing behaviour does not violate the principle. Narrowing pre-conditions or widening post-conditions does. Which in general does happen when inheritance is used for framework templating tasks rather than modelling polymorphic relationships. –  Affe Sep 21 '12 at 23:26
    
I find it confusing that Targets are doing the firing. I think of targets as things that get fired at. –  Skip Head Sep 21 '12 at 23:30
    
@Affe Good catch, it looks like my understanding of the LSP was based on the one-sentence synopsis: "What is wanted here is something like the following substitution property: If for each object o1 of type S there is an object o2 of type T such that for all programs P defined in terms of T, the behavior of P is unchanged when o1 is substituted for o2 then S is a subtype of T." - Barbara Liskov, Data Abstraction and Hierarchy, SIGPLAN Notices, 23,5 (May, 1988). –  Jeffrey Hantin Sep 21 '12 at 23:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The easy way is to do some checking in your code to make sure the classes match up. You can use the instanceof keyword to check if it's the correct class.

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If HttpTarget.fire allows any Load as parameter, it is its job to check if it can fire this Load. So either the Controller calls fire blindly, and fire checks if the given target can fire that kind of Load (with instanceof), or you include a function canFire in every target that implements this check and is called by the Controller.

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The typing problem here is that HttpTarget is not a Liskov subtype of Target, because semantically it is attempting to strengthen the preconditions of Target#fire(Load) to require the Load be HttpLoad.

This can be trivially repaired by declaring Target#fire(Load) throws IncompatibleLoadException and having a default implementation that always throws, forcing Controller to deal with the fact that a mismatched Load can be passed in.

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Best is to implement abstract class or an interface and use instanceof as mentioned before.

With an abstract class:

public abstract class TargetLoad {
    public abstract void fire(TargetLoad i);
}

public class Load extends TargetLoad {
    @Override
    public void fire(TargetLoad i) {
        if (i instanceof Target) return;
        // do fire stuff
    }
}

public class Target extends TargetLoad {
    @Override
    public void fire(TargetLoad i) {
        if (i instanceof Load) return;
        // do fire stuff
    }
}

with an interface:

public interface TargetLoad {
    public void fire(TargetLoad i);
}

public class Load implements TargetLoad {
    @Override
    public void fire(TargetLoad i) {
        if (i instanceof Target) return;
        // do fire stuff
    }
}

public class Target implements TargetLoad {
    @Override
    public void fire(TargetLoad i) {
        if (i instanceof Load) return;
        // do fire stuff
    }
}

In your Controller you refer to your objects as TargetLoad

TargetLoad target = getTarget();
TargetLoad load = getLoad();

target.fire(load);
load.fire(target);
load.fire(load);     //this will do nothing
target.fire(target); //this will do nothing
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I strongly disagree with the slew of answers recommending to use instanceof. Well-written OOP code very rarely needs to use instanceof, and using instanceof will generally make your code awkward and difficult to maintain. As a general rule, avoid instanceof if at all possible.

The previous question you referred to provided a solution using generics. I'm not sure you left the generics code out of your question here; go back to your generic code. Now, add the following method to your driver.

private <L extends Load> void runSuite(TestSuite<L> suite) {
  Target<L> target = testSuite.getTarget();
  L load = testSuite.getLoad();
  target.fire(load);
}
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