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I'm writing a program to take user input from the command line (linux/unix commands), and execute them within my program.

My steps so far:

  1. Ask user for number of commands input
  2. Fork() to create child process
  3. Output Child PID and Parent PID
  4. Allow user to input each command, read each input into an index of argv
  5. Use execv to run each command inside of argv

The main issue is that when it executes, it merely does the "bin/ls/" in the execv command.

Here is a sample output from running my program:

Enter number of commands: 2
Child's PID is 3487. Parent's PID is 3485
Enter a UNIX command: ls
Enter a UNIX command: -al

LIST OF FILES AS IF TYPING "LS" ON THE CMD LINE

Process Complete.


And here is my source code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[20])
{
        int pid;
        int num = 0;

        printf("Enter number of commands: ");
        scanf("%d", &argc);

        pid = fork();

        if(pid == 0)
        {
                printf("Child's PID is %d. Parent's PID is %d\n", (int)getpid(), (int)getppid());

                for(num=0; num < argc; num++)
                {
                        printf("Enter a UNIX command: ");
                        scanf("%s", argv[num]);
                }

                argv[num+1] = 0;

                execv("bin/ls/", argv);
        }
        else
        {
                wait(pid);
                printf("Process Complete.\n");
                exit(0);
        }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You should always check the return codes from system calls. When you do you will see your execv() is going to fail. –  Duck Sep 21 '12 at 23:36
    
I am not very keen on the UI you've chosen to implement (or been instructed to implement). Computers are good at counting; I shouldn't have to. Also, if I type /usr/bin/perl as the command to be executed, I wouldn't be happy to have your shell execute /bin/ls instead. You seem to be taking in the number of arguments rather than the number of commands. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '12 at 0:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Firstly you are defining char* argv[20] in main which is not a good idea. If you ever pass in more than 20 arguments you will exceed the bounds of the array.

Secondly, you are attempting to read a string with scanf("%s", argv[num]) into an address space that is not initialized as far as I can tell.

The argv[] array of "strings" is initialized by the OS when your program is invoked and if you don't pass any arguments to your program you will not have any "strings", meaning that you will be writing to random memory which you might not own.

If you really want to load your commands the way you are doing it now please try the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int pid;
    int num = 0;
    int argc2 = 0;
    char* argv2[20]; // argv2 will point inside of buffer for convenience.
    char* buffer[2000]; // note each array has a limit of 100 characters.

    printf("Enter number of commands: ");
    scanf("%d", &argc2);

    pid = fork();

    if(pid == 0)
    {
            printf("Child's PID is %d. Parent's PID is %d\n", (int)getpid(), (int)getppid());

            for(num=0; num < argc2 && num < 20; num++) // your array is 20 long
            {
                    argv2[num] = &buffer[num * 100];
                    printf("Enter a UNIX command: ");
                    scanf("%s", argv2[num]);
            }

            argv[num] = 0; // no need to add + 1 because the for loop did already anyway.

            execv("Assignments/ls", argv2);
    }
    else
    {
            wait(pid);
            printf("Process Complete.\n");
            exit(0);
    }
}

Alternatively you could just pass arguments to your main program which simply passes them onto the called program like so:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int pid;
    int num = 0;

    printf("You entered %d commands: \n", argc);

    for (num = 0; num < argc; ++num)
    {
        printf("\t%s\n", argv[num]);
    }

    pid = fork();

    if(pid == 0)
    {
            printf("Child's PID is %d. Parent's PID is %d\n", (int)getpid(), (int)getppid());

            execv("Assignments/ls", &argv[1]);
    }
    else
    {
            wait(pid);
            printf("Process Complete.\n");
            exit(0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your assignment of "argv2[num] = buffer + num * 100" will most certainly bring up an error. You're assigning an integer into a char pointer. –  Baelix Sep 21 '12 at 23:44
    
@Baelix I was adding an integer to a char* and then assigning to a char* which should be fine. I changed it to argv2[num] = &buffer[num * 100]; for clarity. Thanks. –  nonsensickle Sep 22 '12 at 0:21
    
Ah okay, that makes more sense now. I went back and restructured my code without using the argv[] and argc arguments passed into main. When my professor (poorly) explained this, she told us to pass in the arguments using argv[]. What I think she meant to say was that we needed to pass OUR function's arguments into execv, who's second parameter is argv[]. None the less, solved my problem. Thanks very much for the help! –  Baelix Sep 22 '12 at 1:03

One specific problem your code has is you must pass argv[idx] as the argument to exec. You're passing an array of char pointers, by passing argv.

Please also be advised that argc contains the full count of arguments, and that full count includes the program itself. argv[0] contains the program name to which you are passing the arguments. I'm not seeing that being reflected in your for loop. That is you are processing your own program and running it.

The way I've written these is to traverse argv in a while (or for, if you prefer), using an int varaiable -- for example int idx=0; -- until I find an argv[idx] pointer that is null.

If, for example, you had three arguments, argc would be 4, and argv[3] would be your last argument to process. argv[4] would be null.

Based on some of the answers you've received, here's a discussion of execv and fork.

share|improve this answer
    
So, essentially, I would run a while(or for loop) like the following? while(argv[idx] != NULL){ execv("/bin/ls", argv[idx]); Or something along these lines? –  Baelix Sep 21 '12 at 23:47
    
What I would do is build this program up in stages, or at least introduce a #define DEBUG logic that, instead of actually launching the commands would printf them out. Also, I believe the answer you got about fork is worth looking into. I don't remember using execv, but I wrote code like this many, many years ago. Look at the link I put in my answer, and test out what you've been given in the other answers. Those answers picked up on things I missed. I just saw and answered on the first things to hit my eyes. –  octopusgrabbus Sep 22 '12 at 0:00
  1. You have wrong logic. use fork just before execv
  2. move execv (together with fork) out of the loop;
  3. 1st argument of the execv - is a path to the binary file to execute; 2nd - array of arguments to pass to the binary. Is this correct that you have in the current directory the sub-directory named 'Assignments' and this directory contains the executable named 'ls'? And, please, read 'man execv' carefully

Update:

Disregard points 1 and 2 above.

man execv:

   The execv(), execvp(), and execvpe()  functions  provide  an  array  of
   pointers  to  null-terminated  strings that represent the argument list
   available to the new  program.   The  first  argument,  by  convention,
   should  point  to the filename associated with the file being executed.
   The array of pointers must be terminated by a NULL pointer.
share|improve this answer
    
Also wait() takes an int status variable, not the pid. If you want to overwrite pid pass it as wait(&pid). –  Duck Sep 21 '12 at 23:29
    
execv is not inside the for loop, and neither is fork(); the 1st argument is the path, yes. I do have a folder named Assignments in the current directory. However, I do not believe this has to be the path to an executable file's location. For instance "/bin/ls" is simply asking for the listing of files in the root folder, and not executing an file; this command works perfectly fine when typed in to the command prompt. –  Baelix Sep 22 '12 at 0:03
1  
Yes, I am sorry, I miscounted braces. You may believe me or not. You better read 'man execv' carefully, please :) –  Serge Sep 22 '12 at 0:05

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