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I'm trying to grep /etc/passwd and /etc/group to list ALL users and each group the user belongs to.

IE:

Jon Doe, root:randomgroup:randomgroup2:randomgroup3
Billy Bob, admin:apache:backups
Timmy Tim, root:www

Anyhow, this is what I have so far but I'm not entirely sure how to get it to grep groups and match on the user field.

cat /etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1,5

This only displays the user with a ":" and the Full Name

How would I go about doing this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even ignoring the possibility of network databases for your files, you really can't use grep for this job, at least, not if you're going to do it really thoroughly. You probably should use Perl or Python or another similar scripting language of your choice.

Note that there is one group specified by number for the user in the /etc/passwd file. There can be an arbitrary number of other groups listed in /etc/group for the same user. Suppose the users 'primary GID' is 23 in /etc/passwd. There is no guarantee that the entry for group 23 in /etc/group will list that user.

Note that you can have all sorts of weirdnesses turn up in the group file.

  • Multiple names for the same GID.
  • Multiple lines for the same group name with different GID values.
  • GID values listed in /etc/passwd that are not listed in /etc/group.
  • Multiple names with the same UID in the /etc/passwd file (often to allow different people to login with their own credentials — name and password — but to all run as UID 0, aka root).

Dealing with all of these is a nightmare — and yes, almost all of these occur on the systems I work on, but do not administer.

Somewhere, I have code to help with this analysis; it is Perl, and uses getpwent() and getgrent() to retrieve the information (from files or network as configured by the admins). It isn't pretty.


For a classroom exercise analysis, you probably need:

From /etc/passwd:

  • user name
  • user ID (UID)
  • primary group ID (GID)

From /etc/group:

  • Name for primary GID.
  • All other group entries that list the user name.

It is much simpler if you simply duck and use the id command to do most of the work for you. Trawl through /etc/passwd with grep to get user names, and then use id to specify the groups the user belongs to. See the answer by gvalkov for an answer which is likely to be sufficient for sane systems.

grep -o '^[^:]*' /etc/passwd |
xargs -L1 id

This gives you names and numbers; tweak the options to id to suit your requirements. This is using GNU grep; the -o option is convenient but not portable. Fortunately, Unix user names do no contain newlines (or colons); this simplifies the use of xargs.


User Group Map

243 lines or Perl, some of it comment. Watch the shebang line; the code is three years old and I've taken to using #!/usr/bin/env perl since this was written; I then have use warnings; at the top of the body of code.

#!/bin/perl -w
#
# @(#)$Id: usergroupmap.pl,v 1.6 2009/06/08 02:30:19 jleffler Exp $
#
# Create a map of groups associated with users

use strict;
use constant debug => 0;

$| = 1;

my $group_entries = 0;  # Number of rows returned by getgrent()
my %usr_hash = ();      # List of lists of GID values keyed by user name
my %gid_hash = ();      # List of GID values count definitions
my %grp_hash = ();      # List of group name values and corresponding GID value
my %grp_count = ();     # List of count of entries with given group name
my %gid_name  = ();     # List of first occurring name for group, indexed by GID

{
    while (my ($name, $password, $gid, $userlist) = getgrent())
    {
        print "# $gid ($name) $userlist\n" if debug > 1;
        $group_entries++                                            ;# if debug > 0;
        $grp_hash{$name}  = $gid  unless defined $grp_hash{$name}   ;# if debug > 0;
        $grp_count{$name} = 0     unless defined $grp_count{$name}  ;# if debug > 0;
        $grp_count{$name}++                                         ;# if debug > 0;
        $gid_hash{$gid}   = 0     unless defined $grp_hash{$gid}    ;# if debug > 0;
        $gid_hash{$gid}++                                           ;# if debug > 0;
        $gid_name{$gid}   = $name unless defined $gid_name{$gid};

        foreach my $user (split /[, ]/, $userlist)
        {
            print ". $user\n" if debug > 1;
            $usr_hash{$user} = { } unless defined $usr_hash{$user};
            $usr_hash{$user}->{$gid} = 1;
        }
        printf "-- Group %-8s reappears with GID %5d (previously %5d)\n",
               $name, $gid, $grp_hash{$name} if $grp_hash{$name} != $gid;
        printf "-- GID   %-8d reappears with name %-8s (previously %-8s)\n",
               $gid, $name, $gid_name{$gid} if $name ne $gid_name{$gid};
    }
}

printf "Number of group entries: %5d\n", $group_entries         ;# if debug > 0;
printf "Number of group   names: %5d\n", scalar(keys %grp_hash) ;# if debug > 0;
printf "Number of group numbers: %5d\n", scalar(keys %gid_hash) ;# if debug > 0;
printf "Number of user    names: %5d\n", scalar(keys %usr_hash) ;# if debug > 0;

{
    foreach my $gid (sort keys %gid_hash)
    {
        printf "    Group ID %5d (%-8s) appears %2d times\n",
               $gid, $gid_name{$gid}, $gid_hash{$gid} if $gid_hash{$gid} > 1;
    }
}

# Nominally, this should print nothing.
# However, when the local /etc/group file and the NIS+ group file disagree, it does.
foreach my $name (sort keys %grp_count)
{
    printf "    Group name %-8s (%-5d) appears %2d times\n",
        $name, $grp_hash{$name}, $grp_count{$name} if $grp_count{$name} > 1;
}

# Determining canonical name for a group turns out to be tricky!
# On Solaris, it appears that:
# --- When groups are listed in /etc/group, the first name for a given GID is used
# -1-   Add to /etc/group:
#       a123::54876:username
#       a12::54876:username
#       a1::54876:username
#       a::54876:username
# ---   With these entries present, first one listed in /etc/group is 'name of group'
# ---   Demonstrated with multiple permutations of 4 entries.
#
# --- When groups are listed via NIS+, the shortest name for a given GID is used
# -1-   In NIS+ data,
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand8    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand3    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand     (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand9    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand1    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand2    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand10   (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand5    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand7    (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand11   (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand12   (previously rand4   )
#       -- GID   1360     reappears with name rand6    (previously rand4   )
# ---   With these entries present, shortest name (rand) is listed by 'ls'.
# -2-   In NIS+ data,
#       -- GID   1240     reappears with name pd       (previously rd      )
# ---   With these entries present, first name with shortest length (rd) is listed by 'ls'.
# -3-   In NIS+ data,
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-vsnet (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs  (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-tech (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-tech1 (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-sys2 (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-mgr1 (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-other (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-sys1 (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-mgr (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-mgr3 (previously vcs-mgr2)
#       -- GID   8714     reappears with name vcs-sys (previously vcs-mgr2)
# ---   With these entries present, shortest name (vcs) is listed by 'ls'.
# ---   Could be first name without punctuation?
# -4-   In NIS+ data + /etc/group data (other::1:root in /etc/group)
#       -- Group other    reappears with GID    20 (previously     1)
# ---   With these entries present, 'chgrp  1 x; ls -l x' lists group as other.
# ---   With these entries present, 'chgrp 20 x; ls -l x' lists group as other.
# ---   Hence, 'ls' must use getgrgid() to determine group name.
# -5-   In NIS+ data
#       -- GID   7777     reappears with name xgrp      (previously pdxgrp  )
# ---   With these entries present, 'chgrp pdxgrp x; ls -l x' lists xgrp as group.
# ---   Hence, as expected, chgrp uses getgrnam() to determine GID, and ls uses getgrgid().
# -6-   Add entry 'ccc::8714:' to /etc/group.
#       With this entry present, 'chgrp 8714 x; ls -l x' lists ccc as group.
# NB: /etc/nsswitch.conf lists 'group: files nis' (and 'passwd: files').
#
# ---   NB: No definitive test with same group name listed in both /etc/group and NIS+.
# ---   NB: No definitive info on why rand.
# ---   NB: No definitive info on why vcs.
# Hence: most reliable way to determine canonical name for a given GID is via getgrgid().
# Determining it from the results of getgrent() is unreliable.

my $max_groups = 0;
my $max_user = "";
my $tot_usrgrp = 0;
my %grp_lists = ();
foreach my $user (sort keys %usr_hash)
{
    my $groups = $usr_hash{$user};
    my $numgrps = scalar(keys %{$groups});
    $tot_usrgrp += $numgrps;
    if ($numgrps > $max_groups)
    {
        $max_groups = $numgrps;
        $max_user = $user;
    }
    my $grplst = "";
    foreach my $group (sort keys %{$groups})
    {
        $grplst .= " $group";
    }
    $grp_lists{$grplst} = 1;
    print "$user: $grplst\n" if debug;
}
printf "Maximum number of groups for one user (%s): %5d\n", $max_user, $max_groups;
printf "Total number of groups listed for all users: %5d\n", $tot_usrgrp;
printf "Total number of distinct group lists: %5d\n", scalar(keys %grp_lists);

my %name_hash = (); # List of distinct names - group names and user names
foreach my $user (keys %usr_hash)
{
    $name_hash{$user} = 1;
}
foreach my $group (keys %grp_hash)
{
    $name_hash{$group} = 1;
}

my $name_offset = 0;
foreach my $name (keys %name_hash)
{
    $name_hash{$name} = $name_offset;
    $name_offset += length($name) + 1;
}
printf "Total space needed for names = %5d\n", $name_offset;

# Add gid to group list if not already present
# If input is sorted, add condition: last if $grpnum > $gid;
sub add_gid
{
    my($gid, @groups) = @_;
    foreach my $grpnum (@groups)
    {
        return(@groups) if ($grpnum == $gid);
    }
    return sort { $a <=> $b } $gid, @groups;
}

# Get group set for given user name
sub getgrsetnam
{
    my($user) = @_;
    my(@groups) = ();
    my($usrref) = $usr_hash{$user};
    print "getgrsetnam(): name = $user\n" if debug > 0;
    push(@groups, sort { $a <=> $b } keys %$usrref) if defined $usrref;
    print "getgrsetnam(): groups = @groups\n" if debug > 0;
    my($name, $pass, $pw_uid, $gid) = getpwnam($user);
    # Not all users listed in groups appear in password
    if (defined $name)
    {
        print "getgrsetnam(): user = $name, $pw_uid, $gid\n" if debug > 0;
        @groups = add_gid($gid, @groups);
    }
    return(@groups);
}

# Get set of group IDs for given user number
sub getgrsetuid
{
    my($uid) = @_;
    print "getgrsetuid(): $uid\n" if debug > 0;
    my($name, $pass, $pw_uid, $gid) = getpwuid($uid);
    print "getgrsetuid(): $name, $pw_uid, $gid\n" if debug > 0;
    my(@groups) = ();
    # Not all UID values have a user name
    if (defined $name)
    {
        print "getgrsetuid(): name = $name\n" if debug > 0;
        @groups = getgrsetnam($name);
        @groups = add_gid($gid, @groups);
    }
    return(@groups);
}

{
    foreach my $user (sort keys %usr_hash)
    {
        print "user = $user\n" if debug > 0;
        my(@groups) = getgrsetnam($user);
        printf "%-9s @groups\n", "$user:";
    }
}

{
    foreach my $uid (0..65535)
    {
        my($name, $pass, $pw_uid, $gid) = getpwuid($uid);
        if (defined $name)
        {
            print "uid = $uid\n" if debug > 0;
            my(@groups) = getgrsetuid($uid);
            printf "%-9s (uid = %6d) @groups\n", "$name:", $uid;
        }
    }
}

__END__

Some of the summary output:

...
-- Group nobody   reappears with GID 60001 (previously    99)
...
Number of group entries:   225
Number of group   names:   221
Number of group numbers:   148
Number of user    names:  1072
    Group name xxxxxxx1 (297  ) appears  2 times
    Group name xxxxxxx2 (296  ) appears  2 times
    Group name xxxxxxx3 (102  ) appears  2 times
    Group name nobody   (99   ) appears  2 times
Maximum number of groups for one user (xxxxxxxx):    32
Total number of groups listed for all users:  2275
Total number of distinct group lists:   108
Total space needed for names =  9562

The strings of x's are distinct names that I've masked.

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How about adding: id -G -n <user> to the above one liner to then return the groups the user is in, will that work for this purpose? –  Clu Sep 21 '12 at 23:29
1  
It depends on your setup. Probably sufficiently for a classroom exercise, yes. If you're worried about which groups a given user belong to for security checking, possibly not; there is typically an upper limit on the number of groups listed by ID (often 16), and a user might be listed in more groups in the two files. I'm just sanitizing the scripts I wrote to analyze the mess I face — look for an update shortly. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 21 '12 at 23:32
    
Thank you for all of the information and assistance Jonathan, it's appreciated. –  Clu Sep 21 '12 at 23:35

I just needed it myself today and came up with the following in around 2 minutes of fiddling with man pages:

for i in $(cat /etc/passwd | awk --field-separator=":" '{print $1}'); do id $i; done

Can also be shortened slightly with:

for i in $(cat /etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1); do id $i; done

The output looks like several id commands in a row:

uid=34(backup) gid=34(backup) groups=34(backup)
uid=1000(bobby) gid=1000(bobby) groups=1000(bobby),27(sudo)
...

The result is not be the most readable but it is quite simple and easy to remember. @gvalkov answer is much more clear in that aspect.

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If the requirement to use grep on /etc/passwd and /etc/group is not a hard one, consider the following solution:

for user in $(getent passwd | cut -d: -f1); do
    printf "%s: %s\n" $user "$(id -nG $user)"
done

Please, heed @JonathanLeffler's advice as this problem is not as straightforward as it seems.

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