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I wrote the code below - I want the DataSource to be a singleton and use the enum idiom for the singleton. I am getting a lot of Data source rejected establishment of connection, message from server: "Too many connections" after some time - is my implementation of the Singleton pattern wrong or the cause is somewhere else ?

import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;
import java.sql.Statement;

import javax.naming.Context;
import javax.naming.InitialContext;
import javax.sql.DataSource;

class DBConnectionPool {

    private DataSource ds = null;

    private DBConnectionPool() {
        try {
            Context context = new InitialContext();
            Context envctx = (Context) context.lookup("java:comp/env");
            ds = (DataSource) envctx.lookup("jdbc/TestDB");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private static enum PoolSingleton {
        POOL_INSTANCE;

        private static final DBConnectionPool singleton = new DBConnectionPool();

        private DBConnectionPool getSingleton() {
            return singleton;
        }
    }

    private static DBConnectionPool getDBConnectionPoolInstance() {
        return PoolSingleton.POOL_INSTANCE.getSingleton();
    }

    static Connection getConnection() {
        try {
            return getDBConnectionPoolInstance().ds.getConnection();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
    }
}

For completeness sake here are the contents of context.xml :

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Context antiJARLocking="true" path="/myapp">
    <Resource name="jdbc/TestDB" auth="Container" type="javax.sql.DataSource"
        maxActive="100" maxIdle="30" maxWait="10000" username="root"
        password="root" factory="org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.DataSourceFactory"
        driverClassName="com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" url="jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/mydb"
        removeAbandoned="true" removeAbandonedTimeout="60" />
</Context>

NB : I am not implementing a connection Pool ! I use the tomcat factory. What I do is wrapping the pool in a Class. The pool is the ds object I think is instantiated only once. I do close the connections +sets + statements in a finally block. Example use :

public User findByUsername(String username) throws DBExFailure {
        Connection conn = DBConnectionPool.getConnection();
        PreparedStatement statement = null;
        ResultSet set = null;
        final String query = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username=?";
        if (conn != null) {
            try {
                statement = conn.prepareStatement(query);
                statement.setString(1, username);
                set = statement.executeQuery();
                while (set.next()) {
                    User user = new User();
                    // user.setId(set.getInt("ID"));
                    user.setUsername(set.getString("username"));
                    user.setName(set.getString("name"));
                    user.setSurname(set.getString("surname"));
                    user.setPassword(set.getString("password"));
                    user.setEmail(set.getString("email"));
                    user.setRole(RolesENUM.values()[set.getInt("role")]);
                    return user;
                }
            } catch (SQLException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
                throw new DBExFailure();
            } finally {
                DBConnectionPool.closeResources(set, statement, conn);
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

Where :

static void closeResources(ResultSet set, Statement statement,
        Connection conn) {
    if (set != null) {
        try {
            set.close();
        } catch (SQLException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    if (statement != null) {
        try {
            statement.close();
        } catch (SQLException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    if (conn != null) {
        try {
            conn.close();
        } catch (SQLException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as off topic by BalusC, jonsca, Mark, Toon Krijthe, oers Sep 23 '12 at 17:50

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I would have to say that the right way to write one is to not write one: Use an existing library like C3P0

This is not meant to be a "smarty pants" answer either. It's just a "don't reinvent the wheel" one, especially a thread-safe pool implementation, which is tricky to do properly and typically creates a minefield of thread-related, subtle and hard-to-fix bugs.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - for sound advice. The best answer is often "don't do that". (Whether it is what the question asker wants to hear is another matter ... ) – Stephen C Sep 22 '12 at 2:40

Your pool is pretty shallow - there's only one connection in it! How will that scale?

You've hard wired the JNDI name. Why not pass it in?

This won't be very good for a multi-threaded application. Connection's not thread safe.

The best advice you got was "don't do it". Use an existing pool. Or, better yet, the one that's built into your Java EE app server.

share|improve this answer
    
Just following class advice - but yes I was worried about multithreading - why is the Pool shallow ? Whenever I ask for a connection won't the data source provide a new one (edited question with the content of context.xml? I am afraid Tomcat has not any pool build in - will look into it. JNDI is rather cryptic for me yet (the code I posted was enum modified class handout sort of) – Mr_and_Mrs_D Sep 22 '12 at 11:25
1  
Tomcat has a pool - you probably didn't configure it yet. tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/… – duffymo Sep 22 '12 at 13:09
    
Care to elaborate on passing the JDNI name in ? Via an xml ? A .properties file ? Also are you sure getConnection is not thread-safe as it is ? Is indeed the pool shallow - see the added context.xml – Mr_and_Mrs_D Sep 22 '12 at 13:17

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