Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

My assignment calls for the line number to be display with the output. The professor suggested I do it with a counter and as seeing Java doesn't have an easy way to print out the current line number, I just created a counter as suggested. The below code is as follows:

  //Count Increment
    for (count = 1; count<= 5; count++)
    {

    }   

    //Display information
    System.out.println(count + "." + " " + "Street:"+ " " + streetName + " " +  "#" + streetNumber);
    System.out.println(count + "." + " " + "Total Rooms:"+ " " + numofRooms);
    System.out.println(count + "." + " " + "Total Area:"+ " " + totalSqFt + " sq.ft");
    System.out.println(count + "." + " " + "The price per Sq. Ft is " + "$" + priceperSqFt);
    System.out.println(count + "." + " " + "The estimated property value is "+ "$" + estimatedPropertyvalue);

However, the output starts the line counter at six as demonstrated here:

6. Street: park avenue #44
6. Total Rooms: 5
6. Total Area: 2500.0 sq.ft
6. The price per Sq. Ft is $120.4
6. The estimated property value is $301000.0

Removing the brackets doesn't help either. How can I get the line count to correctly state 1,2,3,4,5?

Please ask for clarification if needed!! Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Uh, maybe you should start the counter at 1 and increment after each line is printed? (Is this post a joke??) –  Hot Licks Sep 22 '12 at 2:07
1  
@HotLicks: The "joke" portion of your comment is not very welcoming to someone fairly new to SO. Maybe you could be a little more polite? –  Ken White Sep 22 '12 at 2:09
    
Java is a procedural language, which is to say that statements are executed and values are changed in sequence. So when you do for (count ...) {...}, that executes before anything after it (unless there is other control flow to alter the sequence. So by the time you get to that closing } count has been incremented to 6. –  Hot Licks Sep 22 '12 at 2:12
    
No it is not a joke, the count variable was already set to 1 earlier in the code otherwise I'd have to declare it in the For loop. –  Brian Sep 22 '12 at 2:16
    
Welcome to SO, Brian. Don't take the question vote too hard. This type of question had a couple of strikes against it to start with but you'll get used to what's considered more favorably as you get used to the site. Since it seems you're getting started off in programming you might want to consider something like this (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_duck_debugging) as a quick self-check when developing your assignments. –  Carth Sep 22 '12 at 2:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your prints are outside of the for loop. Your for loop ends when the counter is "6" which is when it exits the for loop. This variable doesn't change so the current value is "6",that is why it always prints "6" below on your code. If you want to print the line number for each instruction you could do something like this:

        count = 0;
        System.out.println(++count + "." + " " + "Street:"+ " " + streetName + " " +  "#" + streetNumber);

"++count", you increment the variable the moment you write a line, in the first case it should print 1 then 2 etc. Hope this helped :)

The loop is not required cause you are only counting the lines one time each. If you put those lines in a loop that goes from 0 to 5 you will be counting each line 5 times. Since you only need to count each line ONE time you dont need the loop and just the simple increment I previously mentioned. Hope this clears out why the loop is not required

share|improve this answer
    
+1. You might want to edit to mention that a loop is not required, and explain why not, just for future use by people that find this in a search later. –  Ken White Sep 22 '12 at 2:08
    
You're gonna confuse him too much with pre-increment. Better to start with count at 1 and add a separate increment line between each println. –  Hot Licks Sep 22 '12 at 2:09
    
That's very helpful @rdk1992. I didn't know you could have the increment like ++count like that so that it increments right when the line is printed. Thanks a lot! –  Brian Sep 22 '12 at 2:18
    
@Brian sure no problem :) –  rdk1992 Sep 22 '12 at 2:29

I assume that you have somewhere above this a line defining count:

int count;

So after the for loop, you've incremented count to 6 and then started printing with count left at the last incremented value from the for loop.

So, remove the for loop and just pre-increment the count variable for each line of ouput.

int count = 0;

//Display information
System.out.println( (++count) + "." + " " + "Street:"+ " " + streetName + " " +  "#" + streetNumber);

...
share|improve this answer
class Print{

    static int lineno = 0;

    private int static getLineNo(){
        lineno = lineno + 1;
        return lineno;
    }
}


//Display information
System.out.println(Print.getLineNo() + "." + " " + "Street:"+ " " + streetName + " " +  "#" + streetNumber);
System.out.println(Print.getLineNo() + "." + " " + "Total Rooms:"+ " " + numofRooms);
System.out.println(Print.getLineNo() + "." + " " + "Total Area:"+ " " + totalSqFt + " sq.ft");
System.out.println(Print.getLineNo() + "." + " " + "The price per Sq. Ft is " + "$" + priceperSqFt);
System.out.println(Print.getLineNo() + "." + " " + "The estimated property value is "+ "$" + estimatedPropertyv
share|improve this answer
    
Or you can write your own printlnWithLineNumber routine. –  Hot Licks Sep 22 '12 at 2:13
1  
Great to see an alternative way to the answer. –  Brian Sep 22 '12 at 2:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.