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So I was asked to make a Binary Tree in Haskell taking as input a list of Integers. Below is my code. My problem is that the last element of the list is not getting inserted in the Tree. For example [1,2,3,4] it only inserts to the tree until "3" and 4 is not inserted in the Tree.

    data ArbolBinario a = Node a (ArbolBinario a) (ArbolBinario a) | EmptyNode
deriving(Show)

    insert(x) EmptyNode= insert(tail x) (Node (head x) EmptyNode EmptyNode)

    insert(x) (Node e izq der)
     |x == [] = EmptyNode --I added this line to fix the Prelude.Head Empty List error, after I added this line the last element started to be ignored and not inserted in the tree
     |head x == e = (Node e izq der)
     |head x < e = (Node e (insert x izq) der)
     |head x > e = (Node e izq (insert x der))

Any ideas on whats going on here? Help is much appreciated

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To solve this problem, I have used another function

data Tree a = Node a (Tree a) (Tree a) | EmptyNode deriving(Show)

insert :: Ord a => a -> Tree a -> Tree a
insert x EmptyNode = Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode
insert x (Node y left right)
    | x == y = (Node y left right)
    | x <  y = (Node y (insert x left) right)
    | x >  y = (Node y left (insert x right))

buildtree :: Ord a => [a] -> Tree a
buildtree []     = EmptyNode
buildtree (x:xs) = insert x (buildtree xs)

tree :: Ord a => [a] -> Tree a
tree xs = buildtree (reverse xs)

and to construct a binary tree, you need to call buildtree function. the problem is that you need to reverse the list first. So, tree will do the job.

*Main> insert 5 (insert 12 (insert 2 (insert 10 EmptyNode)))
Node 10 (Node 2 EmptyNode (Node 5 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 12 EmptyNode EmptyNode)

*Main> tree [10,2,12,5]
Node 10 (Node 2 EmptyNode (Node 5 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 12 EmptyNode EmptyNode)

*Main> buildtree [5,12,2,10]
Node 10 (Node 2 EmptyNode (Node 5 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 12 EmptyNode EmptyNode)

UPDATE

you can avoid using another function, this way:

insert2 :: Ord a => [a] -> Tree a -> Tree a
insert2 []     t = t
insert2 (x:xs) EmptyNode = insert2 xs (Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode)
insert2 (x:xs) (Node y left right)
            | x == y = insert2 xs (Node y left right)
            | x <  y = insert2 xs (Node y (insert2 [x] left) right)
            | x >  y = insert2 xs (Node y left (insert2 [x] right))

however, it is not as efficient as using foldl or the other way, the only good thing about it is using only one function to do everything, no reverse is required.

*Main> insert2 [10,2,12,5] EmptyNode
Node 10 (Node 2 EmptyNode (Node 5 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 12 EmptyNode EmptyNode)
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Your implementation of buildTree is the perfect candidate for folding instead of using recursion. It's not only simpler but it removes the need for list reversal. –  OJ. Sep 22 '12 at 3:36
    
yes, you are right. thanks for pointing this out –  user1406062 Sep 22 '12 at 12:10
    
it seems I was missing this case : insert2 [] t = t and calling my funcion sending the tail before creating the nodes. Thanks so much for your detailed explanation. Haskell is one tricky but cool programming language :) –  rdk1992 Sep 22 '12 at 16:27
    
you are welcome –  user1406062 Sep 22 '12 at 21:24
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What isn't helping here is that you're mixing concerns. Instead of having a single method that inserts a list into a tree, why not have a function which inserts a single element into a tree, then another one which adds all elements in a list to the tree? Eg.

data ArbolBinario a = Node a (ArbolBinario a) (ArbolBinario a)
                    | EmptyNode
                    deriving(Show)

-- insert handles only one element
insert :: (Ord a) => a -> ArbolBinario a -> ArbolBinario a
insert x EmptyNode = Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode
insert x n@(Node e izq der)
  | x == e = n
  | x < e = (Node e (insert x izq) der)
  | x > e = (Node e izq (insert x der))

-- insertList folds the list into a tree
insertList :: (Ord a) => [a] -> ArbolBinario a -> ArbolBinario a
insertList xs t = foldl (\a x -> insert x a) t xs

Using something like foldl removes the need for you to worry about what happens when you reach the end of the list. The result is:

insertList [5, 3, 7, 9, 1, 4, 2, 6] EmptyNode
-- output:
-- Node 5 (Node 3 (Node 1 EmptyNode (Node 2 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 4 EmptyNode EmptyNode)) (Node 7 (Node 6 EmptyNode EmptyNode) (Node 9 EmptyNode EmptyNode))

Hope that helps.

Edit ----

I'd also like to point out that it's probably a better idea to follow what other Haskell functions do and change the order of your arguments. See this:

data ArbolBinario a = Node a (ArbolBinario a) (ArbolBinario a)
                    | EmptyNode
                    deriving(Show)

insert :: (Ord a) => ArbolBinario a -> a -> ArbolBinario a
insert EmptyNode x = Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode
insert n@(Node e izq der) x
  | x == e = n
  | x < e = (Node e (insert izq x) der)
  | x > e = (Node e izq (insert der x))

insertList :: (Ord a) => ArbolBinario a -> [a] -> ArbolBinario a
insertList = foldl insert

This means that your functions can be better used with the usual suspects (such as folds, scans, etc). You can see how the definition of insertList has been made simpler.

Just FYI :)

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I disagree with your edit: for consistency with other Haskell functions, it is best for the binary tree to be the last parameter. Look at the insert/delete/update functions in Data.Map, for example: they all take the input map as the final parameter. This makes them easy to compose, e.g. newMap = insert "foo" 4 . delete "bar" . adjust (+4) "baz" $ oldMap. –  dave4420 Sep 22 '12 at 10:16
1  
@dave4420 - you are indeed correct. It seemed like the logical thing to do at the time but it makes less sense now. Thanks for the pointer. –  OJ. Sep 22 '12 at 11:17
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You have got some suggestions for a cleaner way to write the insert function, but so far nobody has told you what went wrong with your implementation, so let me start with that:

data ArbolBinario a = Node a (ArbolBinario a) (ArbolBinario a) | EmptyNode
                      deriving(Show)

insert(x) EmptyNode= insert(tail x) (Node (head x) EmptyNode EmptyNode)

insert(x) (Node e izq der)
 |x == [] = EmptyNode
 |head x == e = (Node e izq der)
 |head x < e = (Node e (insert x izq) der)
 |head x > e = (Node e izq (insert x der))

For brevity, I use a shorter list and abbreviate EmptyNode to E.

insert [1,2] E
~> insert [2] (Node 1 E E)
--   2 > 1, so the last clause, head x > e, is used
~> Node 1 E (insert [2] E)
-- insertion in empty tree, first equation is used
~> Node 1 E (insert [] (Node 2 E E))
-- Now the first clause of the second equation is used
~> Node 1 E (E)

When all elements have been inserted and you reach the end of the list, instead of doing nothing, you delete the node. The minimal change to fix this would be changing the first clause of the second equation for insert to

 |x == [] = Node e izq der

That would however still leave one failure case (which you already have),

insert [] EmptyNode = insert (tail []) (Node (head []) EmptyNode EmptyNode)

will cause *** Exception: Prelude.tail: empty list.

Apart from being the cause of the abovementioned error, the use of head and tail here is also highly unidiomatic. The usual way to define such a function would be to pattern-match on the list. Also unidiomatic is your check for an empty list, x == [], the idiomatic way is to use null x for that. In this case, the other guards require the element type to be an instance of Ord, so there is no semantic change, but in general, x == [] imposes an Eq constraint on the element type, while null x works with arbitrary types.

Finally, although you think your guards head x == e, head x < e, head x > e cover all possibilities (for valid Ord instances, they do - excepting floating point types, where a NaN is neither equal to nor smaller than nor larger than any value, but whether these Ord instances are valid is a matter of debate), the compiler can't be sure of that, and will (when asked to warn about such things, which it usually should be, always compile with -Wall) warn about non-exhaustive patterns in the definition of insert. To cover all cases in a way that the compiler knows all cases are covered, the last guard should have an otherwise condition.

Bringing your code into a more idiomatic shape (and fixing the outstanding insert [] EmptyNode bug) results in

insert :: Ord a => [a] -> ArbolBinario a -> ArbolBinario a
insert []      t         = t     -- if there's nothing to insert, don't change anything
insert (x:xs)  EmptyNode = insert xs (Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode)
-- Using as-patterns, `l` is the entire list, `x` its head, `t` the entire tree
insert l@(x:_) t@(Node e izq der)
    | x == e             = t
    | x < e              = Node e (insert l izq) der
    | otherwise          = Node e izq (insert l der)

Now we can look for further problems. One probably unintended aspect of insert is that if the head of the list of elements to be inserted is already in the tree, the entire list is thrown away and the tree completely unchanged, so e.g.

insert [1 .. 10] (Node 1 EmptyNode EmptyNode) = Node 1 EmptyNode EmptyNode

The usual way to handle such things is to only drop the head of the list and still insert the remaining elements. That would be achieved by changing the last equation of the definition to

insert l@(x:xs) t@(Node e izq der)
    | x == e             = insert xs t
    | x < e              = Node e (insert l izq) der
    | otherwise          = Node e izq (insert l der)

More probably unintended aspects are

  • insert xs EmptyNode always produces a tree in which every node has only one (or none, for the lowest) nonempty subtree, i.e. the constructed tree is basically a list.
  • the clauses in the last equation of the definition strongly suggest that the tree should be a binary search tree, but that property is not maintained by the definition. e.g.

    insert [1,10] (Node 3 (Node 2 E E) (Node 7 E E))
    ~> Node 3 (insert [1,10] (Node 2 E E)) (Node 7 E E)
    ~> Node 3 (Node 2 (insert [1,10] E) E) (Node 7 E E)
    ~> Node 3 (Node 2 (insert [10] (Node 1 E E)) E) (Node 7 E E)
    ~> Node 3 (Node 2 (Node 1 E (Node 10 E E)) E) (Node 7 E E)
    
                           3
                          / \
                         /   \
                        2     7
                       /
                      /
                     1
                      \
                       \
                        10
    

The best way to solve these problems is, as OJ. suggested before, to separate out the case of inserting a single element into a tree

insertOne :: Ord a => a -> ArbolBinario a -> ArbolBinario a
insertOne x EmptyNode = Node x EmptyNode EmptyNode
insertOne x t@(Node e izq der)
    | x == e    = t
    | x < e     = Node e (insertOne x izq) der
    | otherwise = Node e izq (insertOne x der)

and use that to insert each element from the list, finding its position from the top:

insertList :: Ord a => [a] -> ArbolBinario a -> ArbolBinario a
insertList []     t = t
insertList (x:xs) t = insertList xs (insertOne x t)
-- Alternative way:
-- insertList (x:xs) t = insertOne x (insertList xs t)

These patterns of computation are so common that they have been captured in functions defined in the Prelude:

insertList xs t = foldl (flip insertOne) t xs
-- or, for the alternative way:
-- insertList xs t = foldr insertOne t xs

As you can see, with the natural argument order of insertOne, for the left fold, we need to apply the flip combinator to swap its argument order, which hints at the fact that the natural fold operation for lists is the right fold, foldr.

However, since insertOne needs to know its tree argument before it can do anything, it's not a function tailor-made to be used in right folds, using it in a left fold can be more efficient (but to actually have an efficiency gain, one would have to use a strict left fold foldl', available from Data.List, and a stricter version of insertOne).

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Nice explanation Daniel. I need to stop being so lazy and start answering the questions properly. –  OJ. Sep 24 '12 at 4:09
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