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I'd like to accept requests from a php app to my web service. How can I verify that requests made to the web service come from the php app (or indeed any authorised source) and are not forged?

My web service relies on the received requests being from allowed domain(s) and not from some bot that's sending data and portending to be from that domain.

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what you have tried? –  pkachhia Sep 22 '12 at 5:15
    
if your needs are not complex, a simple pre-shared key would be enough. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-shared_key –  Tim G Sep 22 '12 at 5:19

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How can I verify that requests made to the web service come from the php app (or indeed any authorised source) and are not forged?

Well, verify their identity and reject when its wrong or missing.

My web service relies on the received requests being from allowed domain(s) and not from some bot

Actually, what you're thinking here is checking the HTTP referrer. This happens to be one of those fields that is easily spoofed. so you shouldn't really rely on that to be the ultimate test of validity. instead, I'd do the following:

start by googling / researching these topics:

  • HTTP requests, specifically passing data in headers
  • generating auth tokens
  • storing auth tokens in cookies

So, basically, a lot of the time you'll read about APIs that work this way, essentially: a client does an initial authentication API method somehow, which will generate a temporary auth token (which follows a format usually, ie md5(userID+timestamp+authlevel+etc+etc) ). Then you include your auth token in the header in all of the subsequent requests that are made to other API methods. then your API first validates that token, and if it is valid, it executes the method

for tutorials / info about good API development, you should go check out APIGEE

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Hey thanks for the response. I've updated my question slightly to better explain the problem. –  Roman Sep 22 '12 at 5:27
    
my answer applies still. you must make the client at least verify it is who you think it is, and then give them a token to keep. have them pass the token with every request. and if its missing or incorrect, then you have a reason to block the request (regardless of whether or not its from a bot) lol –  Kristian Sep 22 '12 at 5:29
    
i've updated my answer to give you a bit more to chew on –  Kristian Sep 22 '12 at 5:32
    
How can the website verify itself without usernames and passwords? –  Roman Sep 22 '12 at 5:33
    
it doesn't have to be a token based on a user and password. you can use other stuff... an IP maybe. haha sky is the limit man! –  Kristian Sep 22 '12 at 5:34

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