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In iOS 6, viewWillUnload and viewDidUnload are deprecated and UIViewControllers no longer unload views that are not visible on screen during a memory warning. The View Controller Programming Guide has an example of how to manually restore this behavior.

Here is the code sample:

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
    // Add code to clean up any of your own resources that are no longer necessary.
    if ([self.view window] == nil)
    {
        // Add code to preserve data stored in the views that might be
        // needed later.

        // Add code to clean up other strong references to the view in
        // the view hierarchy.
        self.view = nil;
    }
}

Below the code sample is the following note:

The next time the view property is accessed, the view is reloaded exactly as it was the first time.

There is an obvious flaw here. If a view controller that has not loaded its view receives a memory warning it will load its view in the line if ([self.view window] == nil) and then proceed to clean up and release it again. At best, this is inefficient. At worst, it makes the memory conditions worse if a complex view hierarchy and supporting data are loaded. I verified this behavior in the iOS simulator.

I can certainly code around this but seems odd for Apple docs to have such an error. Am I missing something?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The correct check in a view controller for the view being loaded and on screen is:

if ([self isViewLoaded] && [self.view window] == nil)

My full solution in iOS 6 to have a view controller unload views and cleanup similar to iOS 5 is the following:

// will not be called in iOS 6, see iOS docs
- (void)viewWillUnload
{
  [super viewWillUnload];
  [self my_viewWillUnload];
}

// will not be called in iOS 6, see iOS docs
- (void)viewDidUnload
{
  [super viewDidUnload];
  [self my_viewDidUnload];
}

// in iOS 6, view is no longer unloaded so do it manually
- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
  [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
  if ([self isViewLoaded] && [self.view window] == nil) {
    [self my_viewWillUnload];
    self.view = nil;
    [self my_viewDidUnload];
  }
}

- (void)my_viewWillUnload
{
  // prepare to unload view
}

- (void)my_viewDidUnload
{
  // the view is unloaded, clean up as normal
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are viewDidUnload and viewWillUnload there for backwards compatibility? If so, I would suggest commenting the code up to say that these two methods won't be called at all in iOS 6 (as the UIViewController docs state). –  user577537 Oct 10 '12 at 13:43
    
good suggestion, thx. done. –  XJones Oct 10 '12 at 16:09
3  
It may be ok. B/c these methods are called by iOS < 6.0 I wanted to my changes to be cleanly separated from the internal implementation as much as possible so the code path was clear in any OS version. Also, once I move to only support iOS 6+ it's simpler to just remove viewWillUnload and viewDidUnload completely. The my_XXX naming convention is arbitrary and you can name these whatever you like (of course). –  XJones Nov 6 '12 at 17:10
1  
@XJones, in iOS5, it seems that my_viewWillUnload and my_viewDidUnload will be called twice –  Jacky Feb 4 '13 at 0:01
1  
Not in my testing. In iOS5 viewWillUnload and viewDidUnload are called first and once the view is unloaded, the my_viewXXXUnload versions are not called b/c the conditions in the if clause fail. –  XJones Feb 4 '13 at 21:17

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