Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my simple java code. When I compile/run the program, eclipse IDE shows a syntax error. The syntax error does not make any sense to me

class A{
    int x;
    int z;
    int s;

    A(int a,int b){
        x=a;
        z=b;
    }

    void display(){
        System.out.println("x+y :"+(x+z));
    }
}
class B extends A
{
    B(int a, int b, int c){
        x=a;
        z=b;
        s=c;
    }

    void display(){
        System.out.print("In B class...");
        System.out.println("x+y+s :"+(x+z+s));
    }
}
public class Simple {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A ob=new A(10, 20);
        B ob2=new B(20, 30, 40);
        ob.display();
        ob2.display();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You should also provide your syntax error. –  Marko Sep 22 '12 at 7:18
add comment

8 Answers 8

up vote -1 down vote accepted

First off, posting the error given by eclipse would be helpful.

But in any case, your syntax errors are stemming from the fact that you aren't defining the datatype of your variables, such as x, z, s, etc.

For example,

int x = a;
int z = b;

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't provide type for x,z,s, they are inherited from the class A. Actually the code is as follows: this.x=a; this.z=b; this.s=c; –  alexsmail Sep 23 '12 at 18:34
    
See answer below for the actual cause. –  alexsmail Sep 23 '12 at 18:35
add comment

Where is the class a definition " class A"? Where are the data fields definitions (x, z, s for class B and x,z for class A)? Please edit your post

After the post was edited, I've tried to compile it and the error should be as follows:

Simple.java:17: cannot find symbol symbol : constructor A() location: class A B(int a, int b, int c){ ^ 1 error

This means that you should call some constructor of class A when you create a class B because B extends A. You don't have default constructors because you created your own.

Rewrite the constructor of B like this and you'll be fine:

B(int a, int b, int c){
    super(a,b);
    s=c;
}

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
add comment

The (lack of) formatting makes it hard to read. The start of the definition of class A is outside the code block.

It looks like you didn't define the int field s in class B. Should be:

 class B extends A
 {
     int s;

  ...
  }

EDIT: looks like you reformatted and changed it while I was posting my answer...

share|improve this answer
add comment

In your class A, you've provided a constructor that accepts two parameters and you've not defined a parameter-less constructor for A. As such, when you try to instantiate B, which extends A, it fails since it cannot call A()

There're two ways to resolve this:

  • Provide a parameter-less constructor for A

Something like:

class A{
    int x;
    int z;
    int s;

    public A(){
    }

    public A(int a,int b){
        x=a;
        z=b;
    }

    void display(){
        System.out.println("x+y :"+(x+z));
    }
}
  • Call super(a, b) as the first statement in the constructor of B.

For example:

class B extends A
{
    B(int a, int b, int c){
        super(a,b);
        x=a;
        z=b;
        s=c;
    }

    void display(){
        System.out.print("In B class...");
        System.out.println("x+y+s :"+(x+z+s));
    }
}

If you're new to Java, you might want to read about Inheritance and Creating Objects in Java

share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much. yes i am new to java and very new to stackoverflow. –  Obscure Ami Sep 22 '12 at 7:13
add comment

You have explictly declare constructor of Class A, so the class B should explict call his parent's - class A - constructor.

Add below code into the class B's constructor:

super(a, b);

Then your constructor of class B will be looks like:

B(int a, int b, int c) {
    super(a, b);
    x = a;
    z = b;
    s = c;
}

PS, pls take care of the formatting of the code that your pasted. It's hard to read.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. i am very new to stackoverflow, next time i will take care of the formatting –  Obscure Ami Sep 22 '12 at 7:18
add comment

your super class has an two args constructor, when you extend class A in class B's constructor you have call your superclasses's two args constructor. change your sub class constructor code to this.

B(int a, int b, intc) {
   super(a,b); //this has to be in the first line inside the constructor.
    //do your things
  }

this link explains it

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to set the values to the properties that are defined in the super class, call super() method in the sub class constructor.

So, Your sub class constructor should look like as follows

public B(int a, int b, int c){
    // The following statement will automatically sets the values to the base class             properties (which are already derived into derived class).
    super(a, b);
    // No Need of setting the values to the super class properties... The above statement will automatically sets the values...
    s=c;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

There are a few things that needs to be considered here: -

  • When you declare a class without any constructor, the compiler does that for you by inserting a default constructor, that is an empty zero-arg constructor..
  • If you have explicitly declared your one-arg constructor(or any other constructor), compiler doesn't add any default constructor.
  • Every time you make an instance of a class, constructors are invoked from top-down in inheritance hierarchy. So, if you are not using inheritance, then instantiating a class first invokes the Object class's constructor (which is the top-level class of any inheritance or non-inheritance hierarchy)
  • We invoke super class constructor, using super(), but if we haven't done it explicitly, compiler will add this for us.. If you are adding it by yourself, make sure it should be the first statement of a constructor.. You can pass argument to super, to call super class's non-zero arg constructor, but compiler adds only zero-arg super().

Now, Having said all that, lets move to your code.. In your class A, you have declared a three-arg constructor, so compiler won't add any.. So, precisely you don't have any zero-arg constructor there. Now, your class B extends A and hence instantiating that class will invoke super-class constructor which is A here. Now, since you have not added any super() call in your B class, compiler will add there automatically. But, what compiler adds is: super(), which will call A's zero-arg constructor, which we saw that you don't have.

So, how you can solve that??

Either add a default constructor to your class A: -

class A {
    public A() {
    }
}

Or add an explicit super() call as your first statement in B's constructor to invoke your 3-arg A's constructor : -

class B extends A {
    public B(int a, int b) {
          super(a, b, 19);
          /* More Code */
    }
}

Similar, to super(), you can also use this() in your constructor, to invoke the same class's constructor. Same rule applies to this().. It should be the first statement in your constructor..

So, we can see that we can either have super() or this() in our constructor.

I hope this much information will solve at least your current problem.

share|improve this answer
    
very good explaining...voted –  mmhasannn Sep 22 '12 at 15:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.