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this code is for skin color segmentation in C#.NET,please tell me what is difference bet R & r
what tells the values of f_upper and f_lower to us?

color = bm.GetPixel(i, j);
r = Convert.ToDouble(color.R) / Convert.ToDouble(color.R + color.G + color.B);
g = Convert.ToDouble(color.G) / Convert.ToDouble(color.R + color.G + color.B);
f_upper = -1.3767 * r * r + 1.0743 * r + 0.1452;
f_lower = -0.776 * r * r + 0.5601 * r + 0.1766;
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r is a variable of type double that holds the result of the right hand portion of the expression. R is a property of color. –  Tim Sep 22 '12 at 6:59
    
U r correct ,but i want the meaning in the context of image proccesing –  Ravindra Bagale Sep 22 '12 at 7:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

r is a variable declared previously and is of type double (if the code isn't wrong it have to be declared in that way). While R is a property of the Color struct, which indicates the color Red.

For more info on RGB color model look here, while for Color struct look here.

More specifically r is normalized value between 0 and 1 - % of R(Red color) in the color. f_upper and f_lower is not clear for me

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Can you elaborate on what you mean by normalized? Just curious. –  Tim Sep 22 '12 at 7:07
    
Normalized value is a value that establishes a relationship between part and whole. It's means value of R if R+G+B are the unit of measurement. –  FLCL Sep 22 '12 at 7:15
    
Got it. Thanks :) –  Tim Sep 22 '12 at 7:18
    
@Tim For example the dot product is calculated to find the angle between two normalized vectors. And it's calculated because as you know cos and sin can assume values from -1 to 1. (now the name unit vector says everything) –  Fuex Sep 22 '12 at 7:28

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