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I am trying to set up a simple server/client akka (using Akka 2.0.3) application, but it failed to connect. Beforehand here is the basic code:

import com.typesafe.config.ConfigFactory
import akka.actor.Actor
import akka.actor.ActorSystem
import akka.actor.Props

class Server extends Actor {
  def receive = {
    case s: String => println("Got " + s)
  }
}

val serverSystem = ActorSystem("server", ConfigFactory.load(ConfigFactory.parseString("""
  akka {
    actor {
      provider = "akka.remote.RemoteActorRefProvider"
    }
    remote {
      transport = "akka.remote.netty.NettyRemoteTransport"
      netty {
        hostname = "localhost"
        port = 5678
      }
    }
  }
""")))

val server = serverSystem.actorOf(Props[Server], name = "server")
Thread.sleep(500)
println("started")
Thread.sleep(500)

val clientSystem = ActorSystem("client", ConfigFactory.load(ConfigFactory.parseString("""
  akka {
    actor {
      provider = "akka.remote.RemoteActorRefProvider"
    }
  }
""")))
val remoteServer = clientSystem.actorFor("akka://server@XXX:5678/user/server")

remoteServer ! "HEY"

Thread.sleep(3000)
clientSystem.shutdown
serverSystem.shutdown

I know that the configurations should be placed in external files.
If you replace XXX with localhost it works:

started
Got HEY

But if I used my external (resolved) IP (PC behind home router) for XXX the HEY message never arrives. I thought it is due to some firewall problem and forwarded the related TCP and UDP ports at my router and also opened/allowed them at my Windows firewall. So after that the following code worked (also XXX replaced with my external IP). A started ServerTest can be connected by a ClientTest:

import java.net.ServerSocket
object ServerTest extends App {
  println("START server")
  val ss = new ServerSocket(5678)
  val s = ss.accept()
  println(s)
  println("END")
}

import java.net.Socket
object ClientTest extends App {
  println("START client")
  val s = new Socket("XXX", 5678)
  println(s)
  println("END")
}

So it´s not a port/firewall problem, isn´t it?! So where is the problem???

share|improve this question
1  
Akka Remoting is not dealing with firewalls or NAT: akka.io/faq –  Viktor Klang Sep 22 '12 at 15:55
    
@Viktor Although it´s answers my question, I am still wondering why the socket version is capable and akka is not. –  Peter Schmitz Sep 25 '12 at 7:21
    
@Viktor Would you mind to post your comment as an answer so I can accept it?! –  Peter Schmitz Sep 25 '12 at 7:22
    
Btw, you need to put an externally reachable hostname or IP as "hostname" in your config. "localhost" is not an externally reachable address. –  Viktor Klang Sep 25 '12 at 8:52
    

1 Answer 1

localhost usually means 127.0.0.1, which is only one of the possibly many interfaces (cards) in a computer. The server binding to localhost won't receive connections connecting to the other interfaces (including the one with the external address).

You should either specify the external address in the server, or 0.0.0.0 which means "bind to all interfaces".

share|improve this answer
1  
Binding the server to the external address fails with Exception in thread "main" org.jboss.netty.channel.ChannelException: Failed to bind to: /84.187.XXX.XXX:5678, so I tried your 0.0.0.0 which binds but doesn´t receive the HEY-message. The same with 192.168.2.101, the IP-address of my LAN-interface(card) which is connected to the router. So any new thoughts? –  Peter Schmitz Sep 22 '12 at 13:08
    
By the way. 0.0.0.0 makes sense compared to println(new ServerSocket(5678)) which yields ServerSocket[addr=0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0,port=0,localport=5678]. –  Peter Schmitz Sep 22 '12 at 13:10

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