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Let's say I have this:

struct coor
{
   int x;
   int y;
   COORD operator=(coor c)
   {
      COORD C={c.x,c.y}
      return C;
   }
}

and I needed to do:

coor c={0,0};
COORD C=c;

I could add operator overloading to coor, but how do you do that to return to left side?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Operator = must assign values to members of the object itself. The return value is there just to make a = b = c and similar things work. In your case it is irrelevant. Also, if you have A = B, the = defined in A will be used and if you have B = A, the = in B is used. What you need is to write a = in COORD that takes coor parameter and updates members of this.

And the following does not call operator=:

COORD C=c;

It calls a matching constructor.

and the operator= MUST return *this for things like this: a=b=c=d to work but this is conventional

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struct coor
{
   int x;
   int y;
   COORD operator=(coor c)
   {
      COORD C;
      C.x = c.x;
      C.y = c.y;
      return C;
   }
}
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To overload the operator= so that it assigns a coor object to a COORD object, you must do that inside the COORD struct:

struct COORD
{
    int x;
    int y;
    COORD& operator=(coor& c)
    {
        this->x = c.x;
        this->y = c.y;
        return *this;
    }
};

However, as others mentioned, this overloading is applied to assignments like:

coor c = {0,0};
COORD C;
C = c;

But not for

coor c = {0,0};
COORD C = c;

As the second line is actually a calling of a constructor of COORD which takes an object of coor as an argument. The body could look something like:

COORD(coor c):x(c.x),y(c.y)
{
}
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