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The following code explains the situation I encountered:

#ifdef __cplusplus
namespace ns
{
class pod
{
    const short foo;
    const char bar;
public:
    pod(short f,char b):foo(f),bar(b){}
    char foobar();
};
}
#else
typedef struct pod pod;
#endif


#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"{
#endif

extern pod* pod_new(short f, char b);//BANG!!!
extern char pod_foobar(pod* p); //BANG!!!

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

I can't put the C linkage functions inside the namespace ns, or the C client won't find their definitions. When I pull them out of the namespace, the C++ definition won't compile either,all because of the pod solution, which I learned from C++ FAQ Lite,it's only a preprocessor trick. And sadly, this trick couldn't deal with namespaces.

What am I supposed to do? Should I throw out all type-safety, and replace pod* with void*, or is there a nicer solution for this kinda situation? Any advices? Please!

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I suppose this is a cooked down example, but your typedef misses a ; –  Jens Gustedt Sep 22 '12 at 12:03

2 Answers 2

I'd just give two different declarations for the functions

for C++:

extern "C" ns::pod* pod_new(short f, char b);
extern "C" char pod_foobar(ns::pod* p);

and for C:

typedef struct pod pod;
extern pod* pod_new(short f, char b);
extern char pod_foobar(pod* p);

But if this doesn't satisfy you, for C++ you could also have a typedef

typedef ns::pod ns_pod;

for C

typedef struct ns_pod ns_pod;

and then have the same common function prototype.

extern ns_pod* pod_new(short f, char b);
extern char pod_foobar(ns_pod* p);

Edit: In C the struct pod or struct ns_pod is an incomplete type, so in C directly you could never do anything that uses the fields or asks for its size. The difference between a pointer to an incomplete type and a void* is that you can only assign such a struct pointer to another struct pointer of the same incomplete type.

typedef struct ns_pod2 pod2;
ns_pod* q = pod_new(...);   // valid
ns_pod2* r = pod_new(...);  // a constraint violation! (= compiler error)

The second one would need an explicit cast, if you want to insist. This is one of the reasons why casts are frowned upon by many C programmers.

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Doesn't it berak one definition rule? (You define ns::pod for c++ and ::pod for C) –  Lol4t0 Sep 22 '12 at 12:14
    
@jens-gustedt Thank for all your response. I don't want my C++ side code be poluted by this mixed header. And could you or anyone explain to me what the relation between ns:pod* and C side typedefed pod* ? I know on the C++ side ns::pod keeps the type checking, but on the C side, does the incomplete struct name really mean anything? –  Need4Steed Sep 22 '12 at 12:23
    
@Lol4t0, no there is only one definition, C never sees any definition. In C there is only a forward declaration and struct pod or struct ns_pod is an incomplete type. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 22 '12 at 13:20
    
@Need4Steed, please see my edit –  Jens Gustedt Sep 22 '12 at 13:31
    
@jens Thanks again. –  Need4Steed Sep 22 '12 at 13:43

I figured it out myself :) by checking the symbols of the obj files with nm.

It turns out that the C++ namespaces have no effects on functions with C linkage, therefore I can rewrite the code above like this:

#ifdef __cplusplus
namespace ns
{
class pod
{
    const short foo;
    const char bar;
public:
    pod(short f,char b):foo(f),bar(b){}
    char foobar();
};
}


#else
typedef struct pod pod;
#endif 


#ifdef __cplusplus
namespace ns{
extern "C"{
#endif

pod* pod_new(short f, char b);
char pod_foobar(pod* p);
void pod_free(pod* p);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
}
#endif
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