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If I do the following assignement when vm.TempRowKey is null then will the value of newRowKey be null?

var newRowKey = vm.TempRowKey.DotFormatToRowKey();

Also is there a way that I can make the following throw an exception if the dotFormatRowKey does not have the format x.x where x is a number?

public static string DotFormatToRowKey(this string dotFormatRowKey) {
    var splits = dotFormatRowKey.Split('.')
                 .Select(x => String.Format("{0:d2}", Int32.Parse(x)))
                 .ToList();
    return String.Join(String.Empty, splits.ToArray());
}
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if u try to access vm.TempRowKey when its null,it will throw a null reference exception. –  unikorn Sep 22 '12 at 13:23
    
Your Split/Select code also accepts 12.123.3.44444, is that intentional? –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '12 at 13:30
1  
@Prabhu: Generally, yes. If DotFormatToRowKey is an extension method then not necessarily (though in this case yes but the key thing is the NRE would be thrown in the extension method, not the calling line). –  Chris Oct 23 '14 at 15:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

when vm.TempRowKey is null

Then TempRowKey.DotFormatToRowKey(); will throw a null-reference exception.

throw an exception if the dotFormatRowKey does not have the format x.x where x is a number?

public static string DotFormatToRowKey(this string dotFormatRowKey) 
{
    if (dotFormatRowKey == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("dotFormatRowKey");    

    // maybe @"^\d\d?\.\d\d?$" is a beter regex. 
    // accept only 1|2 digits and nothing before|after
    if (! Regex.IsMatch(dotFormatRowKey, @"\d+\.\d+"))  
       throw new ArgumentException("Expected ##.##, was " + dotFormatRowKey);

    var splits = dotFormatRowKey.Split('.')
                 .Select(x => String.Format("{0:d2}", Int32.Parse(x)))
                 .ToList();  // ToList() is never needed

    // ToArray() not needed in Fx >= 4.0
    return String.Join(String.Empty, splits.ToArray()); 
}

Small detail: You are using both ToList() and ToArray() on splits. That is double work and in .NET 4 you don't need either.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your help ! –  Marilou Sep 22 '12 at 13:35
    
You're welcome. But Guffa's loop and Concat() are better. –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '12 at 13:45
    
aa1.1aaa is a match for \d+\.\d+ –  BrunoLM Sep 22 '12 at 13:46
    
Yeah, I tend to always leave out ^$ when it's not crystal clear. I'll edit. –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '12 at 13:48
    
The first part of the answer isn't right is it? Due to the way extension methods work you can call them on null objects though of course the contents of the extension method may throw if it isn't ready for it. The point being though that TempRowKey.DotFormatToRowKey(); won't throw the exception, the .Split called on the key in the extension method will . –  Chris Oct 23 '14 at 15:18

No, the result will not be null. You can call the extension method with a null reference, but the extension method isn't written to handle null values, so you will get an eception when you try to use the Split method on the null reference.

To check for the format "x.x" you can check the length of the result of the Split, then use TryParse to check if the values were possible to parse:

public static string DotFormatToRowKey(this string dotFormatRowKey) {
  var splits = dotFormatRowKey.Split('.');
  if (splits.Length != 2) {
    throw new FormatException("The string should contain one period.");
  }
  var s = splits.Select(x => {
    int y;
    if (!Int32.TryParse(x, out y)){
      throw new FormatException("A part of the string was not numerical");
    }
    if (y < 0 || y > 99) {
      throw new FormatExcetpion("A number was outside the 0..99 range.");
    }
    return y.ToString("d2");
  }).ToArray();
  return String.Concat(s);
}
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Maybe check 0 <= y <= 99 as well, given the d2. –  Henk Holterman Sep 22 '12 at 13:44
    
@HenkHolterman: Good point. I added that as a check after the parsing. –  Guffa Sep 22 '12 at 13:49

If I do the following assignement when vm.TempRowKey is null then will the value of newRowKey be null?

This should cause a NullReferenceException, because dotFormatRowKey will be null and then you'll be calling Split() (which is not an extension method) on a null value.

Also is there a way that I can make the following throw an exception if the dotFormatRowKey does not have the format x.x where x is a number?

Currently, the use of int.Parse() enforces that you have only integer values and "."'s. It does not enforce that all integer values are the same, nor that there is only 1 "." (e. g. this would not throw on 1.2.3). If you want to add additional error checking, this would be easy to do:

// test that all int values were the same (not sure if you want this but you said x.x)
if (splits.Distinct().Count() > 1) { throw new ExceptionOfSomeSort("error"); }

// test that you have exactly two values
if (splits.Count != 2) { throw new ExceptionOfSomeSort("error"); }

Another option would be to validate the entire string up front with a regular expression, something like:

@"\d+\.\d+"
share|improve this answer
public static string DotFormatToRowKey(this string dotFormatRowKey)
        {
            Regex validationRegex = new Regex(@"\d.\d");
            if (!validationRegex.Match(dotFormatRowKey).Length.Equals(dotFormatRowKey.Length)) throw new FormatException("Input string does not support format x.x where x is number");

            var splits = dotFormatRowKey.Split('.')
                .Select(x => String.Format("{0:d2}", Int32.Parse(x)))
                .ToList();
            return String.Join(String.Empty, splits.ToArray());
        }
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For your first question.. Try and see what happens.

Second question, you can use TryParse, and if that fails simply.. Throw an exception.

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You have to check if it is null, or else you will get an exception.

if (null == dotFormatRowKey)
    return null;

And you can validate a pattern using Regex.

Regex.IsMatch(input, "^\d+\.\d+$");

See

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure, but does IsMatch() method return true when input string CONTAINS sequence which matches regular expression, but not when whole input string matches regex??? –  Dmytro Tsiniavskyi Sep 22 '12 at 15:36
    
@DmytroTsiniavsky what determines "CONTAINS" or "WHOLE INPUT" is not the method, but the pattern. IsMatch \d+\.\d+ will return true for a1.1a, because it matches, while ^\d+\.\d+$ will return false, because I am specifying that it has to start with a number, a point in the middle and end with a number, nothing more, nothing less. –  BrunoLM Sep 22 '12 at 15:42

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