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Looking at the System.IO.File class, for example, I see the static Exists method, but I don't see any ExistsAsync counterpart. I suspect File.Exists could block for quite some time if the file in question is, say, on a network share. Sure, I could always use Task.Run, but that won't make use of I/O completion ports.

I could ask the same about many other static methods of the File class.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know why there isn't a File.ExistsAsync method. It could be that "another process can potentially do something with the file in between the time you call the Exists method and perform another operation on the file, such as Delete" and that catching exceptions is still required to ensure proper function of an application that accesses an existing file.

In any case, you could write your own.

public static async Task<bool> FileExistsAsync(string file)
{
    return await Task.Factory.StartNew(() => File.Exists(file));
}

...which of course does not use IO Completion to get asynchronous IO...

Update: I think File is generally a convenience wrapper. You can do almost everything that File offers using other APIs, which do offer asynchronous abilities. In the case of Exists, it doesn't use anything that could use IO Completion ports, it just calls FindFirstFile and checks for error.

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It could be that "another process can potentially do something with the file in between the time you call the Exists method and perform another operation on the file, such as Delete" - with that reasoning you might as well not have File.Exists either.. and my question still stands for other overloads, say ReadAllLines –  Ohad Schneider Sep 22 '12 at 14:43
    
I see your point. So you're saying that for most operations you could use a FileStream, and for the other operations (exists, set attribute, etc.) you couldn't use completion ports anyway ? –  Ohad Schneider Sep 22 '12 at 14:51
    
Right, FindFirstFile doesn't use async IO (it could never, because it doesn't do any IO on the file). At some point they have to have a trade off against a perfectly designed and implemented base class library and getting it release in a reasonable amount of time. File.Exists aside, I image because most other methods are "convenience" that they felt the effort wasn't worth the drawbacks considering you can do all of those things with other new *Async methods with a bit of extra work. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 22 '12 at 14:54

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