Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want need to translate a notation (e.g. 'main:message:new') to the referred object property (resource[main][message][new]).

var notation = 'main:message:new';

var ressource = {
    message: { new: 'something' }
};

var splitKeys = function(keys, object) {
    var keys, pointer;
    pointer = object;
    keys = keys.split(':');
    for (i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
        // here is the error
        if (pointer[keys[i]] === undefined) break;
        pointer = pointer[keys[i]];
    }
    return pointer;
};

console.log(splitKeys(notation, ressource));

As you see I got problems with the error handling. If there is a ressource notation which doesn't match a concrete ressource I want to return nothing. Unfortunately I always get an error thrown 'cannot read property undefined of undefined'...

share|improve this question
1  
Wrap new in quotes where it says message: { new: 'something' }. Access it with resource.messsage["new"];. –  0x499602D2 Sep 22 '12 at 14:55
1  
if (!pointer.hasOwnProperty([keys[i]])) { break; } –  benqus Sep 22 '12 at 14:56
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first property name, called main, is not present in your resource object, thus your method will always return the entire object instead of the property value you are aiming at, which is { new: 'something' }:

var splitKeys = function(keys, object) {
    var pointer = object;
    var parent = pointer;
    keys = keys.split(':').slice(1); // exclude `main`
    for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {
        if (pointer[keys[i]] === undefined) break;
        parent = pointer;
        pointer = pointer[keys[i]];
    }
    return parent;
};

This will return the new object, i.e., { new: 'something' }. If you want to return the property value instead, return pointer instead of parent.

DEMO.

share|improve this answer
    
No offence, but using var will not override a parameter. It'll have no impact on the parameter, just like if you use var in the same function more than once for the same variable. –  I Hate Lazy Sep 22 '12 at 16:20
    
Again, no offence, but the .hasOwnProperty test isn't safe since you'll get an error if the property is defined with a null or undefined value (except for at the end of the traversal of course). –  I Hate Lazy Sep 22 '12 at 16:22
    
@user1689607: None taken :-), you are absolutely right, I've edited my answer. –  João Silva Sep 22 '12 at 16:39
    
We have just tested the ({'a':null}).hasOwnProperty('a'); expression, returns true in Chrome... And the same with undefined... –  benqus Sep 24 '12 at 12:11
add comment

Your code doesn't give my any error, so there may be some other issue.

But if you want to return nothing when the resource doesn't match, then you should use return instead of break.

var notation = 'main:message:new';

var ressource = {
    message: { new: 'something' }
};

var splitKeys = function(keys, object) {
    var keys, pointer;
    pointer = object;
    keys = keys.split(':');
    for (i = 0; i < keys.length; i++) {

        if (pointer[keys[i]] === undefined) 
            return null;

        pointer = pointer[keys[i]];
    }
    return pointer;
};

console.log(splitKeys(notation, ressource));

Also, if pointer[keys[i]] is null, the loop will continue, so you may want to change your test.

if (pointer[keys[i]] == null)

This will check for both null and undefined.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.