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My code looks like this:

// Connect to SQLite DB
DB('/path/to/sqlite.db');

DB('BEGIN TRANSACTION;');

// These loops are just examples.
for ($i = 1; $i <= 10000; $i++)
{
    for ($j = 1; $j <= 100; $j++)
    {
    	DB('INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") VALUES (?, ?);', $i, 'Testing ' . $j);
    }
}

DB('END TRANSACTION;');

And here is the DB() function:

function DB($query)
{
    static $db = null;

    if (is_file($query) === true)
    {
    	$db = new PDO('sqlite:' . $query, null, null, array(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE => PDO::ERRMODE_WARNING));
    }

    else if (is_a($db, 'PDO') === true)
    {
    	$result = $db->prepare($query);

    	if (is_a($result, 'PDOStatement') === true)
    	{
    		if ($result->execute(array_slice(func_get_args(), 1)) === true)
    		{
    			if (stripos($query, 'INSERT') === 0)
    			{
    				return $db->lastInsertId();
    			}

    			if (stripos($query, 'SELECT') === 0)
    			{
    				return $result->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
    			}

    			return $result->rowCount();
    		}
    	}

    	return false;
    }

    return true;
}

The problem is that the DB() call inside the inner loop is taking to long to complete, I was thinking that doing something like this could speed up considerably the execution:

DB('BEGIN TRANSACTION;');

for ($i = 1; $i <= 10000; $i++)
{
    $queries = array();

    for ($j = 1; $j <= 100; $j++)
    {
    	$queries[] = 'INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") VALUES (?, ?);' /*, $i, 'Testing ' . $j;*/
    }

    DB(implode("\n", $queries));
}

DB('END TRANSACTION;');

The problem is I don't know how I could prepare (replace and escape) all the question marks with the respective variables, is there any way I can accomplish this?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are inserting lots of data into a table, try inserting the data in one query.

$query = 'INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") VALUES ';
$data = array();
for ($i = 1; $i <= 10000; $i++) {
  for ($j = 1; $j <= 100; $j++) {
    $query .= '(?,?),';
    $data[] = $i;
    $data[] = 'Testing '.$j;
  }
}

$query = substr($query, 0, -1);
DB($query, $data);

This should eliminate the overhead with single insert queries. There's a limit on the query lenght though, if you have troubles with query lenght, try issueing DB() calls more often in for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
This was what I was looking for however I'm getting a weird error with the query INSERT OR REPLACE INTO "test" VALUES (?, ?), (?, ?), (?, ?); = "Warning: PDO::prepare(): SQLSTATE[HY000]: General error: 1 near ",": syntax error" any idea why? – Alix Axel Aug 10 '09 at 14:22
    
PS: Same happens with INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") VALUES (?, ?), (?, ?), (?, ?); – Alix Axel Aug 10 '09 at 14:23
    
Correct SQL is INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") SELECT ?, ? UNION SELECT ?, ? UNION SELECT ?, ?; – Alix Axel Aug 10 '09 at 15:29

Why do you use prepared statements if you "prepare" them in the loop ? (in the DB function)

Make a prepare befor the loop, and in the loop just give the values and execute. Of course this would require a rewrite of your DB method.

Oh and btw. is your ID column the primary key ? if so you have another problem couse "i" would be for 100 "j" the same :)

For example:

$sth = $dbh->prepare('INSERT INTO "test" ("id", "name") VALUES (:id, :name)');
$j=0;
for ($i = 1; $i <= 10000; $i++){
   $j = ($j==100) ? 0 : $j++;
   $sth->execute(array(':id' => $i, ':name' => 'Testing ' . $j));     
}
share|improve this answer

Unfortunately I think that the problem may be with the structure of your code.

In your loop of INSERT statements, the statements are all identical and there is no need to call $db->prepare each time. The idea behind prepared statements is that you call $db->prepare() once, and execute() can be called multiple times on the same statement object. You're calling $db->prepare() every time, which is causing overhead in parsing the SQL statement and creating a new object.

Consider re-writing your DB() function like this:

function do_query($db, $pdo_statement, $query, $args)
{
    if ($pdo_statement->execute($args) === true)
    {
        if (stripos($query, 'INSERT') === 0)
        {
          return $db->lastInsertId();
        }
        if (stripos($query, 'SELECT') === 0)
        {
          return $result->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
        }
        return $result->rowCount();
    }
}

function DB($query)
{
    static $db = null;

    if (is_file($query) === true)
    {
      $db = new PDO('sqlite:' . $query, null, null, array(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE => PDO::ERRMODE_WARNING));
    }

    else if (is_a($db, 'PDO') === true)
    {
      $result = $db->prepare($query);

      if (is_a($result, 'PDOStatement') === true)
      {
        $args = func_get_args();
        if (is_array($args[1])) {
            $ret = array();
            foreach ($args[1] as $args) {
                $ret[] = do_query($db, $query, $result, $args);
            }
            return $ret;
        }

        return do_query($db, $query, $result, array_slice(func_get_args(), 1));
      }

      return false;
    }

    return true;
}

So if you want to run the same query with lots of values, you create two-dimensional array of the values you want to insert, and call DB('INSERT INTO....', $values). The DB() function checks to see if the second parameter to the function (after $query) is an array and if so it loops through running $query against the values in the array. This way, the loop doesn't involve re-preparing the SQL statement each time, just re-executing it with different values. The return value of the function will be an array of the results of each query.

share|improve this answer

The DB function as originally posted issues a filesystem stat() system call each time it is run to check if the query string is a file. While that isn't solely responsible for the slow execution, it contributes to it.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, however I coded this function with portability (a single function that is able to execute all the common DB operations) in mind, not speed. I solved this problem using michal kralik suggestion and I also added all the already prepared queries into a static array, that saved a lot of execution time. – Alix Axel Aug 22 '09 at 3:41

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