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I'm having some trouble figuring out why my code is not working, and would appreciate if someone could point out what I'm missing. It's a basic algorithm problem: given a set of distinct sorted integers, determine whether there is an element such that a[i] = i (a[3] = 3, for example).

I've tried to debug it using print statements, but it's only making one call to FindIndex and not recursing.

Here's the code:

import math

def FindIndex(SetToSearch, beginningIndex, endingIndex):
    """Searches a list of sorted integers to see if there is some a[i] == i

    Keyword Arguments:
    SetToSearch -- a list of disctinct sorted integers 
    beginningIndex -- start point of index to search
    endingIndex -- end point to search """
    # calculate midpoint of set
    midpointIndex = math.ceil((beginningIndex + endingIndex) / 2)
    midpoint = SetToSearch[int(midpointIndex)]
    print "beginningIndex: %s, endingIndex: %s" %(beginningIndex,endingIndex)
    print "midpointIndex: %s, midpoint: %s" % (midpointIndex, midpoint)
    # check whether ending index is greater then beginning index
    if (endingIndex > beginningIndex):
        return "There is no value in this set such that a[i] = i"
    if (endingIndex == beginningIndex):
        if SetToSearch[beginningIndex] == SetToSearch[endingIndex]:
            return "a[%s] is equal to %s" % [beginningIndex, beginningIndex]
    if (midpoint == midpointIndex):
        return "The value at index %d" % midpointIndex
    if (midpoint > midpointIndex):
        print "midpoint > midpointIndex evaluated to true and executed this"
        return FindIndex(SetToSearch, 0, midpointIndex)
    if (midpoint < midpointIndex):
        print "midpoint < midpointIndex evaluated to true and executed this"
        return FindIndex(SetToSearch, midpointIndex + 1, len(SetToSearch) -1)
    else:
        "Something is wrong with your program, because you should never see this!"

sampleSet = [-10, -8, -6, -5, -3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 ]
lastIndex = len(sampleSet) - 1

FindIndex(sampleSet,0,lastIndex)
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1  
Do you have to use recursion? –  arshajii Sep 22 '12 at 17:36
    
So what output did you get? –  Useless Sep 22 '12 at 17:36
    
Your syntax at the end of the else is invalid. It won't do what you think it will. –  Makoto Sep 22 '12 at 17:38
    
The first call to FindIndex returned expected results for the first print statements: beginningIndex: 0, endingIndex: 9 midpointIndex: 4.0, midpoint: -3. None of the conditionals, including the else executed. –  Ryan M Sep 22 '12 at 17:40
    
As an aside, I don't think your math.ceil line quite works. You're using Python 2, so (beginningIndex + endingIndex) / 2 always returns an integer. If you want to round up when beginningIndex + endingIndex is odd, you could divide by 2.0 instead, to make sure it's a float. –  DSM Sep 22 '12 at 17:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem isn't recursion. It's just that your first condition is always true: endingIndex is always greater than beginningIndex. That condition returns without recursion, so the function ends there.

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Thanks...careless mistake on my part. –  Ryan M Sep 22 '12 at 17:42

You can do that using for loop like :

def find_index_equal_value(set):
    for i in range(0, len(set)):
        val = set[i]
        if(val == i):
           print "Index matches value."
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Firstly, if you can't see what happened, it's because you need to print the returned string:

print FindIndex(sampleSet,0,lastIndex)

Now, if I run it I get:

beginningIndex: 0, endingIndex: 9
midpointIndex: 4.0, midpoint: -3
There is no value in this set such that a[i] = i

which means this if matched:

# check whether ending index is greater then beginning index
if (endingIndex > beginningIndex):
    return "There is no value in this set such that a[i] = i"

... well, of course it did - endingIndex should always be greater than beginningIndex!


For future reference, did you print the string? Did you see the output line and not understand why it took that branch? Did you try stepping through the code with pdb?

share|improve this answer
    
No to both, but thanks for the two tips. I'll be sure to use those going forward. –  Ryan M Sep 22 '12 at 19:36

First of all you must add return to the start of line 48.
Second, add print to start of last line.

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