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In newer versions of .net, there are a number of extensions methods which accept IEnumerable<T> or IEnumerable. One such method is OfType<TResult> which returns an enumerable that contains only elements of the original sequence which can be cast to the specified type T. This method perfectly happily chug away using a non-generic IEnumerable to process all the items of the original list, regardless of the type of the original list and the destination type. If the original list is an IEnumerable<int> and TResult is int, it will get each item of the original list as a non-generic object and then cast it, even though it could just use the original IEnumerator<int>. If the original list is an IEnumerable<int> and TResult is StringBuilder, it will likewise chug through boxing all the items in the original list even though none of them could possibly be cast to the destination type.

How difficult would it be to write a method which would take an IEnumerable<TSrc> and convert it to an IEnumerable<TResult>, handling efficiently the cases in which either all items in the original enumeration are guaranteed to appear in the latter, or in which the type of the source enumerator would imply that the latter would be empty (assuming that all variations of IEnumerable a type supports would return the same sequence of items)? To be sure, one wouldn't terribly often be trying to cast a sequence to the type it already holds, but it's not uncommon to have a generic class with multiple type parameters that will sometimes overlap and sometimes not.

share|improve this question
    
Value types cannot derive from a base class. Their only common base will always only be Object, which means you always have to box at least one value if you want to compare two different value types without specifically using a method that knows the two types you want to compare--which Enumerable.Intersect and Except don't accept anyway. So it's not possible without writing different methods. – Peter Ritchie Sep 23 '12 at 18:59
    
@PeterRitchie: I'm assuming that two items of different types may be safely assumed to be unequal. If one of the type parameters is a value type and is not convertible to the other, the items cannot match. If one is a value type and the other isn't, but the former is convertible to the latter and implements IEquatable<T1>, then one can perform a comparison without any boxing by checking to see if the type of the second matches the first and, if so, casting the second (already a reference type, so no boxing) to IEquatable<T1> and using IEquatable<T1>.Equals(firstObject). – supercat Sep 23 '12 at 19:21
    
that would be an unsafe assumption because disparate types can be compared--which is part of why Object.Equals is overridable. For example you the following results in true: byte b = a;int i = 1;var t = b.Equals(i) – Peter Ritchie Sep 23 '12 at 19:29
    
the point being that equality is encapsulated in Equals and while two types that can be converted between each other can the be compared, you don't know if Equals is doing that – Peter Ritchie Sep 23 '12 at 19:35
    
@PeterRitchie: The reason that b.Equals(i) is not that b overrides Object.Equals, but rather that it overloads equals with comparisons for numeric types. Cast either operand to Object and the comparison will return false; I am unaware of any type in the Framework which will overload Object.Equals in such a fashion as to return true when comparing itself to any object of any other types, other than value types and nullable types which will compare as equal to their boxed equivalents. – supercat Sep 23 '12 at 21:31

IEquatable<T>.Equals should be consistent with the Object.Equals override. I'm not sure specifically using IEquatable<T> directly offers any value.

It sounds to me like you simply want to make sure boxed objects use the unboxed values for the equality test. You should be able to do most of what you want with an equals like this:

private static bool Equals<T1, T2>(T1 first, T2 second)
{
    // if either are boxed, try Equals with unboxed values (dynamic)
    if (typeof(T2) == typeof(object) && second.GetType().IsValueType)
    {
        dynamic dsec = second;
        if (typeof(T1) == typeof(object) && second.GetType().IsValueType)
        {
            dynamic dfir = first;
            return Equals(dfir, dsec);
        }
        return Equals(first, dsec);
    }
    if (typeof(T1) == typeof(object) && second.GetType().IsValueType)
    {
        dynamic dfir = first;
        Equals<dynamic, T2>(dfir, second);
    }
    // neither are boxed, just fall back to their Equals overrides...
    var t = Object.Equals(first, second);
    return t;
}

Enumerable.Intersect and Except work only with collections of the same type, so if the type was Object it should do what you want.

Update:

Value types cannot derive from a base class. Their only common base will always only be Object, which means you always have to box at least one value if you want to compare two different value types without specifically using a method that knows the two types you want to compare--which Enumerable.Intersect and Except don't accept anyway. So it's not possible without writing different methods.

Update 2:

It's a poor assumption to assume that if two types can't been converted between each other (or one to the other) that that means they can never be equal. For example:

public struct One
{
    public int Value;
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Value.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public struct Two
{
    public int Value;
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj is Two) return this == (Two)obj;
        if (obj is One) return this.Equals((One)obj);
        return base.Equals(obj);
    }

    public bool Equals(One one)
    {
        return one.Value == Value;
    }

    public static bool operator==(Two one, Two two)
    {
        return one.Value == two.Value;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Two one, Two two)
    {
        return !(one == two);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Value.GetHashCode();
    }
}

// ...

    Console.WriteLine(two.Equals(one));
    Console.WriteLine(two.Equals((Object)one));
    Console.WriteLine(two.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(one.GetType()) || one.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(two.GetType()));

Results in True, True and False. So, clearly two objects can be "equal" while not being convertible between each other.

share|improve this answer
    
As written, your code violates the rule that types should override Equals(Object) in such fashion as to define an equivalence relation, which would in turn imply that Object.Equals(X,Y) should equal Object.Equals(Y,X) for any X and Y. Even if one added code to struct One to override its Equals method to make it reflexive with that of Two, such behavior would still be very different from anything I know of in the Framework. Can you identify any situation where Object.Equals(X,Y) can be true even though X.GetType() != Y.GetType(), and X and Y are both Framework types? – supercat Sep 23 '12 at 21:50
    
Seems irrelevant to your original question since many framework types violate guidelines too. Like: Byte b = 10; Int32 i = b; Debug.Assert(b.Equals(i) == (b == i)); Clearly Byte is not correctly defining an equivalence relation as defined by "Override the Equals method whenever you implement the equality operator (==), and make them do the same thing." at bit.ly/SnmMQm – Peter Ritchie Sep 23 '12 at 22:10
    
Many overloads of the == operator will cause both sides to be converted the same type before doing the comparison. In your example, both operands to the == operator will be converted to type Int32. Some types also define overloads of Equals, which may also cause conversion before comparison. Note, however, that methods to manipulate generic collections types are essentially never expected to use overloads of == or Equals, but rather use a supplied equality comparer, or else use either IEquatable<T>.Equals(T) or the virtual Equals(Object). – supercat Sep 23 '12 at 22:29
    
Yes, and that's irrelevant with regard to the guideline as it refers to Equals(object) because Equals(object) always takes an object parameter and cannot convert and must box – Peter Ritchie Sep 23 '12 at 23:09

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