Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

enter image description here

As an example I have 5 objects. An object is the red dots bound together or adjacent to each other. In other words X+1 or X-1 or Y+1 or Y-1.

enter image description here

I need to create a MS SQL VIEW with will contain the first XY coordinate of each object like:

    X,Y
=======
1.  1,1
2.  1,8
3.  4,3
4.  5,7
5.  6,5

I can't figure out how to group it in a VIEW (NOT using stored procedure). Anybody have any idea would be of great help. Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
This is an interesting problem, but I'm not sure how good (or at least efficient) SQL Server will be at identifying that those are five distinct objects... –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 22 '12 at 18:10
3  
Plus you have to define "first XY coordinate". If both (1,2) and (2,1) are in an object, which one should be declared as first? –  ypercube Sep 22 '12 at 18:17
    
@Aaron - apparently SQL Server innately supporting parallel operations is very useful here. –  RichardTheKiwi Sep 23 '12 at 20:34
    
@Richard ok, but parallelism isn't necessarily an indication of "better performance." :-) –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 23 '12 at 20:39
    
@Aaron I think I used the word "useful". For a small problem space up to tens of cells wide, maybe even hundreds, the solution is pretty viable. I used "parallel" loosely to encompass the set-based, concurrent depth-based searching that is possible in SQL. I thought it was fun anyway, but maybe that's why it should be on codegolf? –  RichardTheKiwi Sep 23 '12 at 20:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The other answer is already pretty long, so I'm leaving it as-is. This answer is much better, simpler and also correct whereas the other one has some edge-cases that will produce a wrong answer - I shall leave that exercise to the reader.

Note: Line breaks are added for clarity. The entire block is a single query

;with Walker(StartX,StartY,X,Y,Visited) as (
    select X,Y,X,Y,CAST('('+right(X,3)+','+right(Y,3)+')' as Varchar(Max))
    from puzzle
    union all
    select W.StartX,W.StartY,P.X,P.Y,W.Visited+'('+right(P.X,3)+','+right(P.Y,3)+')'
    from Walker W
    join Puzzle P on
      (W.X=P.X   and W.Y=P.Y+1 OR   -- these four lines "collect" a cell next to
       W.X=P.X   and W.Y=P.Y-1 OR   -- the current one in any direction
       W.X=P.X+1 and W.Y=P.Y   OR
       W.X=P.X-1 and W.Y=P.Y)
      AND W.Visited NOT LIKE '%('+right(P.X,3)+','+right(P.Y,3)+')%'
)
select X, Y, Visited
from
(
    select W.X, W.Y, W.Visited, rn=row_number() over (
                                   partition by W.X,W.Y
                                   order by len(W.Visited) desc)
    from Walker W
    left join Walker Other
        on Other.StartX=W.StartX and Other.StartY=W.StartY
            and (Other.Y<W.Y or (Other.Y=W.Y and Other.X<W.X))
    where Other.X is null
) Z
where rn=1

The first step is to set up a "walker" recursive table expression that will start at every cell and travel as far as it can without retracing any step. Making sure that cells are not revisited is done by using the visited column, which stores each cell that has been visited from every starting point. In particular, this condition AND W.Visited NOT LIKE '%('+right(P.X,3)+','+right(P.Y,3)+')%' rejects cells that it has already visited.

To understand how the rest works, you need to look at the result generated by the "Walker" CTE by running "Select * from Walker order by StartX, StartY" after the CTE. A "piece" with 5 cells appears in at least 5 groups, each with a different (StartX,StartY), but each group has all the 5 (X,Y) pieces with different "Visited" paths.

The subquery (Z) uses a LEFT JOIN + IS NULL to weed the groups down to the single row in each group that contains the "first XY coordinate", defined by the condition

     Other.StartX=W.StartX and Other.StartY=W.StartY
        and (Other.Y<W.Y or (Other.Y=W.Y and Other.X<W.X))

The intention is for each cell that can be visited starting from (StartX, StartY), to compare against each other cell in the same group, and to find the cell where NO OTHER cell is on a higher row, or if they are on the same row, is to the left of this cell. This still leaves us with too many results, however. Consider just a 2-cell piece at (3,4) and (4,4):

StartX  StartY  X   Y   Visited
3       4       3   4   (3,4)          ******
3       4       4   4   (3,4)(4,4)
4       4       4   4   (4,4)
4       4       3   4   (4,4)(3,4)     ******

2 rows remain with the "first XY coordinate" of (3,4), marked with ******. We only need one row, so we use Row_Number and since we're numbering, we might as well go for the longest Visited path, which would give us as many of the cells within the piece as we can get.

The final outer query simply takes the first rows (RN=1) from each similar (X,Y) group.


To show ALL the cells of each piece, change the line

select X, Y, Visited

in the middle to

select X, Y, (
    select distinct '('+right(StartX,3)+','+right(StartY,3)+')'
    from Walker
    where X=Z.X and Y=Z.Y
    for xml path('')
    ) PieceCells

Which give this output

X           Y           PieceCells
1           1           (1,1)(2,1)(2,2)(3,2)
3           4           (3,4)(4,4)
5           6           (5,6)
7           5           (7,5)(8,5)(9,5)
8           1           (10,1)(8,1)(8,2)(9,1)(9,2)(9,3)
share|improve this answer
    
Its also good but the same problem. The diagonal adjacent coordinates are taken as a different object which is not the case. Please see the image link or [link] (i45.tinypic.com/30tjdif.png) –  Ziad Sep 25 '12 at 1:58
    
Actually adding ....W.X=P.X+1 and W.Y=P.Y+1 OR W.X=P.X-1 and W.Y=P.Y-1 solves the problem! :) Thanks –  Ziad Sep 25 '12 at 2:00
1  
Then your condition in the question "X+1 or X-1 or Y+1 or Y-1" is wrong. I've organised my TSQL code and conditions very well, so changing the condition should be a trivial exercise for you. Look at lines 8-11 which expresses what you put in the question. –  RichardTheKiwi Sep 25 '12 at 2:01
    
Thanks for your suggestions, can you suggest from these similar perspectives a suggestion for this problem too? stackoverflow.com/questions/14034344/… ... Thanks in advance! –  Ziad Dec 28 '12 at 19:58

Ok. Its little bit hard. But in any case, I'm sure that in a simpler way this problem can not be solved. So we have table:

CREATE Table Tbl1(Id int, X int, Y int)
    INSERT INTO Tbl1
    SELECT 1,1,1 UNION ALL
    SELECT 2,1,2 UNION ALL
    SELECT 3,1,8 UNION ALL
    SELECT 4,1,9 UNION ALL
    SELECT 5,1,10 UNION ALL
    SELECT 6,2,2 UNION ALL
    SELECT 7,2,3 UNION ALL
    SELECT 8,2,8 UNION ALL
    SELECT 9,2,9 UNION ALL
    SELECT 10,3,9 UNION ALL
    SELECT 11,4,3 UNION ALL
    SELECT 12,4,4 UNION ALL
    SELECT 13,5,7 UNION ALL
    SELECT 14,5,8 UNION ALL
    SELECT 15,5,9 UNION ALL
    SELECT 16,6,5

And here is select query

with cte1 as 
/*at first we make recursion to define groups of filled adjacent cells*/
/*as output of cte we have a lot of strings like <X>cell(1)X</X><Y>cell(1)Y</Y>...<X>cell(n)X</X><Y>cell(n)Y</Y>*/
(
SELECT id,X,Y,CAST('<X>'+CAST(X as varchar(10))+'</X><Y>'+CAST(Y as varchar(10))+'</Y>' as varchar(MAX)) info
FROM Tbl1

UNION ALL

SELECT b.id,a.X,a.Y,CAST(b.info + '<X>'+CAST(a.X as varchar(10))+'</X><Y>'+CAST(a.Y as varchar(10))+'</Y>' as varchar(MAX))
FROM Tbl1 a JOIN cte1 b 
ON ((((a.X=b.X+1) OR (a.X=b.X-1)) AND a.Y=b.Y) OR (((a.Y=b.Y+1) OR (a.Y=b.Y-1)) AND a.X=b.X)) 
AND a.id<>b.id
AND
b.info NOT LIKE
('%'+('<X>'+CAST(a.X as varchar(10))+'</X><Y>'+CAST(a.Y as varchar(10))+'</Y>')+'%')
),

cte2 as
/*In this query, we select only the longest sequence of cell connections (first filter)*/
/*And we convert the string to a new standard (x,y | x,y | x,y |...| x,y) (for further separation)*/
(
SELECT *, ROW_NUMBER()OVER(ORDER BY info) cellGroupId
FROM(
    SELECT REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(info,'</Y><X>','|'),'</X><Y>',','),'<X>',''),'</Y>','') info
    FROM(
        SELECT info, MAX(LEN(info))OVER(PARTITION BY id)maxlen FROM cte1
        ) AS tmpTbl
    WHERE maxlen=LEN(info)
)AS tmpTbl
),


cte3 as
/*In this query, we separated strings like (x,y | x,y | x,y |...| x,y) to many (x,y)*/
(
SELECT cellGroupId, CAST(LEFT(XYInfo,CHARINDEX(',',XYInfo)-1) as int) X, CAST(RIGHT(XYInfo,LEN(XYInfo)-CHARINDEX(',',XYInfo)) as int) Y
FROM(
    SELECT cellGroupId, tmpTbl2.n.value('.','varchar(MAX)') XYinfo
    FROM 
        (SELECT CAST('<r><c>' + REPLACE(info,'|','</c><c>')+'</c></r>' as XML) n, cellGroupId FROM cte2) AS tmpTbl1
        CROSS APPLY n.nodes('/r/c') tmpTbl2(n)
    ) AS tmpTbl
),

cte4 as
/*In this query, we finally determined group of individual objects*/
(
SELECT cellGroupId,X,Y
FROM(
    SELECT cellGroupId,X,Y,ROW_NUMBER()OVER(PARTITION BY X,Y ORDER BY cellGroupId ASC)rn
    FROM(
        SELECT *, 
        MAX(SumOfAdjacentCellsByGroup)OVER(PARTITION BY X,Y) Max_SumOfAdjacentCellsByGroup_ByXY /*calculated max value of <the sum of the cells in the group> by each cell*/
        FROM(
            SELECT *, SUM(1)OVER(PARTITION BY cellGroupId) SumOfAdjacentCellsByGroup /*calculated the sum of the cells in the group*/
            FROM cte3
            )AS TmpTbl  
        )AS TmpTbl
    /*We got rid of the subgroups (i.e. [(1,2)(2,2)(2,3)] its subgroup of [(1,2)(1,1)(2,2)(2,3)])*/
    /*it was second filter*/
    WHERE SumOfAdjacentCellsByGroup=Max_SumOfAdjacentCellsByGroup_ByXY 
)AS TmpTbl
/*We got rid of the same groups (i.e. [(1,1)(1,2)(2,2)(2,3)] its same as [(1,2)(1,1)(2,2)(2,3)])*/
/*it was third filter*/
WHERE rn=1
)


SELECT X,Y /*result*/
FROM(SELECT a.X,a.Y, ROW_NUMBER()OVER(PARTITION BY cellGroupId ORDER BY id)rn
FROM cte4 a JOIN Tbl1 b ON a.X=b.X AND a.Y=b.Y)a /*connect back*/
WHERE rn=1 /*first XY coordinate*/
share|improve this answer
    
@Daima, Hi, It is good but the neighboring coordinates which are diagonal (yet adjacent to each other) are also considered as one object. [link] (tinypic.com/r/1fhhmt/6). See the image here <a href="tinypic.com?ref=1fhhmt"; target="_blank"><img src="i50.tinypic.com/1fhhmt.png"; border="0" alt="Image and video hosting by TinyPic"></a> –  Ziad Sep 25 '12 at 1:45

Let's assume your coordinates are stored in X,Y form, something like this:

CREATE Table Puzzle(
  id int identity, Y int, X int)
INSERT INTO Puzzle VALUES
  (1,1),(1,2),(1,8),(1,9),(1,10),
  (2,2),(2,3),(2,8),(2,9),
  (3,9),
  (4,3),(4,4),
  (5,7),(5,8),(5,9),
  (6,5)

This query then shows your Puzzle in board form (run in TEXT mode in SQL Management Studio)

SELECT (
  SELECT (
    SELECT CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT *
                             FROM Puzzle T
                             WHERE T.X=X.X and T.Y=Y.Y)
                THEN 'X' ELSE '.' END
    FROM (values(0),(1),(2),(3),(4),(5),
                (6),(7),(8),(9),(10),(11)) X(X)
    ORDER BY X.X
    FOR XML PATH('')) + Char(13) + Char(10)
  FROM (values(0),(1),(2),(3),(4),(5),(6),(7)) Y(Y)
  ORDER BY Y.Y
  FOR XML PATH(''), ROOT('a'), TYPE
).value('(/a)[1]','varchar(max)')

It gives you this

............
.XX.....XXX.
..XX....XX..
.........X..
...XX.......
.......XXX..
.....X......
............

This query done in 4 stages will give you the result of the TopLeft cell, if you define it as the Leftmost cell of the TopMost row.

-- the first table expression joins cells together on the Y-axis
;WITH FlattenOnY(Y,XLeft,XRight) AS (
-- start with all pieces
select Y,X,X
from puzzle
UNION ALL
-- keep connecting rightwards from each cell as far as possible
select B.Y,A.XLeft,B.X
from FlattenOnY A
join puzzle B on A.Y=B.Y and A.XRight+1=B.X
)

-- the second table expression flattens the results from the first, so that
-- it represents ALL the start-end blocks on each row of the Y-axis
,YPieces(Y,XLeft,XRight) as (
-- 
select Y,XLeft,Max(XRight)
from(
select Y,Min(XLeft)XLeft,XRight
from FlattenOnY
group by XRight,Y)Z
group by XLeft,Y
)
-- here, select * from YPieces will return the "blocks" such as 
-- Row 1: 1-2 & 8-10
-- Row 2: 2-3  (equals Y,XLeft,XRight of 2,2,3)
-- etc

-- the third expression repeats the first, except it now combines on the X-axis
,FlattenOnX(Y,XLeft,CurPieceXLeft,CurPieceXRight,CurPieceY) AS (
-- start with all pieces
select Y,XLeft,XLeft,XRight,Y
from YPieces
UNION ALL
-- keep connecting rightwards from each cell as far as possible
select A.Y,A.XLeft,B.XLeft,B.XRight,B.Y
from FlattenOnX A
join YPieces B on A.CurPieceY+1=B.Y and A.CurPieceXRight>=B.XLeft and B.XRight>=A.CurPieceXLeft
)

-- and again we repeat the 2nd expression as the 4th, for the final pieces
select Y,XLeft X
from (
select *, rn2=row_number() over (
    partition by Y,XLeft
    order by CurPieceY desc)
from (
  select *, rn=row_number() over (
      partition by CurPieceXLeft, CurPieceXRight, CurPieceY
      order by Y)
  from flattenOnX
) Z1
where rn=1) Z2
where rn2=1

The result being

Y           X
----------- -----------
1           1
1           8
4           3
5           7
6           5

Or is your representation in flat form something like this? If it is, give us a shout and I'll redo the solution

create table Puzzle (
  row int,
  [0] bit, [1] bit, [2] bit, [3] bit, [4] bit, [5] bit,
  [6] bit, [7] bit, [8] bit, [9] bit, [10] bit, [11] bit
)
insert Puzzle values
(0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0),
(1,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0),
(2,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0),
(3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0),
(4,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0),
(5,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0),
(6,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0),
(7,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0)
share|improve this answer
1  
FYI, I noticed the question has Y going rightwards, but the solution has X going right and Y going down. It should be trivial to adapt –  RichardTheKiwi Sep 23 '12 at 0:06

I used geometry in a follow-up question here that also answers this question.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.