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Going through some source of other people's work. And I find many examples of while loops with no body

while(true);

What will that do? Not quite sure what the point of all that is beside making it lag a bunch? java snippet code

do
{
    if (!iterator.hasNext())
    {
        break;
    }

    Object obj = iterator.next();

    if (obj instanceof something)
    {

    }
}
while (true);
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In what language? –  David Robinson Sep 22 '12 at 19:04
    
while(true); is just infinite loop in C. Its purpose depends on context. –  aland Sep 22 '12 at 19:05
    
Really depends on the context. Could you provide a bit bigger snippet than that? –  ldigas Sep 22 '12 at 19:06
    
i added some snippet code. the language is java –  Coders Rock Sep 22 '12 at 19:09

4 Answers 4

This is the end of a do..while loop. These loops are run once before the loop-condition is checked first. while(true) at the end means that the loop will run infinitely or until there is a break statement inside the loop called.

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what you pasted is actually a do-while loop, which is executed at least once (even if the condition for while evaluates to false). The body of the loop here is what you see between {} after do

This portion in your code makes the loop a non-infinite one:

if (!iterator.hasNext())
{
    break;
}
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It is a do..while loop basically.

do {
  // ....
} while(true);

This is an implementation of infinite loop.

It is used when you want something to run forever once it is started.

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Allright thanks. so all another way of doing this cut be for(int i=1; i<2; i--) or? –  Coders Rock Sep 22 '12 at 19:21
    
for(;;) too...but less intuitive than the upper one. –  Ratan Sharma Sep 22 '12 at 19:24

This is provably equivalent to:

while (iterator.hasNext()) {
 Object obj = iterator.next();

 ...
}

and I really don't understand why anyone would code it any other way. It is probably decompiled C code translated directly into Java. That is the only reason I can think of for anyone to write it like that.

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