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I'm new to c++. I'd like to have an const array of a certain length. It is a rather long array so the standard method for initializing constant arrays, namely:

const bool some_array[] = {true, false, true};

is impractical. I'd like to initialize a constant array of boolean values. I've tried to implement it like this:

bool* sieve_of_eratosthenes(bool* n, n_length);

int main(){
    bool b[500];
    bool primeList[] = {sieve_of_eratosthenes(b, 500)};
}

this almost works, though it isn't very elegant or space-efficient (i'd be open to comments on how better implement this array). The trouble is, the zeroth element of the returned array, i.e. primeList, is set to true/1, even though I've explicitly set the zeroth element in the boolean array returned by my s_of_e() function to false/zero.

primeList[0] == 1

when it should be:

primeList[0] == 0

since 0 isn't prime...

Can anyone enlighten me as to why it's doing this?

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You have some sort of logic error here, list of primes (primeList) can no way be made out of bools. should be isPrime or isComposite or something like that. –  Öö Tiib Sep 22 '12 at 19:40
    
thanks everyone, all very helpful and informative! vectors ended up providing the best solution –  Nathaniel Gentile Sep 23 '12 at 2:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code,

bool* sieve_of_eratosthenes(bool* n, n_length);

int main(){
    bool b[500];
    bool primeList[] = {sieve_of_eratosthenes(b, 500)};
}

doesn't work because

  • the function returns a pointer, not an array, and

  • even if the function returned a reference to an array, that would decay into a pointer in its use in the initializer list.

(Also it should not compile because implicit int has never been part of C++.)

The pointer is converted to bool, and that's the only element your array gets.

Instead, do this:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<bool> sieve_of_eratosthenes( int const n_length )
{
    // Code here.
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<bool> const primeList = sieve_of_eratosthenes( 500 );
}

Note however that std::vector is designed to optimize the case of bool elements, with an ordinary C++ implementation using just 1 bit per element.

That can be seen as a feature or as a design level bug, depending on one's view.

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bool primeList[] = {sieve_of_eratosthenes(b, 500)};

This doesn't work the way you think it does. Built-in types are all convertible to bool, 0 (that includes NULL, of course) will convert to false, anything else will convert to true. What happens there is the first element of the array is set to true, because you return a non-NULL pointer. And that's it, the array is 1 element long, since you didn't specify the size explicitly and and provided only 1 initializer.

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And btw, if you thought this would work because you heard someone say "arrays are just pointers...", they were wrong :) –  jrok Sep 22 '12 at 19:15

Arrays and pointers are different things. You are creating an array but using a pointer in the initialization list for the first element. The pointer will be converted to bool and as it is not a null pointer it becomes true.

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