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Please excuse me in advance if I should be asking this in a Physics forum, but given that I'm talking about the iPhone's acceleration, coming from the accelerometer, I decided to post it here.

Whenever I push the iPhone (device lying on the table - screen facing upwards) forward (towards the top of the device), the accelerometer seems to be recording negative acceleration for the most part, with a few positive acceleration values, on that same Y-axis, appearing here and there from time to time.

This is a sample of the acceleration values on the Y-axis, during such a forward movement across the Y-axis :

-0.02
-0.03
-0.04
-0.03
-0.04
-0.04
-0.07
-0.02
-0.02
-0.02
-0.02
 0.00 // what's happening here ?
 0.02 // what's happening here ?
 0.02 // what's happening here ?
-0.00
-0.02
-0.03
-0.03
 0.02 // what's happening here ?
 0.04 // what's happening here ?
 0.01 // what's happening here ?
-0.00
-0.04
-0.03
-0.02
-0.03
-0.05

What do the negative acceleration values stand for and what do the positive ones stand for in the above example ?

If I understand correctly, negative acceleration values mean the device is accelerating forward at that point.

Now, positive acceleration values would mean the device is moving backwards, while 0.00 acceleration would mean the device is either standing still* or moving at a constant speed.

So why do I get those positive acceleration values during that forward movement of the device?

Am I missing something ?

The only reason I'm asking, obviously, is because I want to create a method in order to know whether the device is moving forward or backwards on the Y-axis.

*I also noticed a 0.01 value comes and goes even when the device is completely immobile, but I'm guessing this is just "noise" right?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So why do I get those positive acceleration values during that forward movement of the device?

Ehm, you seem to be understanding that an acceleration of 0 means no acceleration, i. e. being still or moving at a constant speed. Now if you move the phone at a seemingly constant speed in one direction, it might not be perfectly constant - both small positive and negative accelerations may occur.

*I also noticed a 0.01 value comes and goes even when the device is completely immobile, but I'm guessing this is just "noise" right?

Right. The accelerometer sensor is not perfect. It reacts to many other factors than just pure acceleration. I'm not aware of the exact internals of how the iPhone's accelerometer works, but if I guess right, it's a piezoelectric one, so it can be sensitive to other kind of physical (mechanical and electromagnetic) effects.

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So what would the small positive accelerations stand for in the case of the forward movement I presented? The negative ones occur because of the forward movement, but what about the positive ones? –  Norton Commander Sep 22 '12 at 19:20
    
@LukaP. No. They are not the result of the movement. They're the result of the acceleration. If you fail to move the phone at a perfectly constant speed, there will be acceleration and deceleration in its movement - the latter is indicated by the positive acceleration value. –  user529758 Sep 22 '12 at 19:22
1  
@LukaP there's nothing controversary in the two, in fact they're straight equivalent. Forward acceleration seems to be negative. Backwards acceleration (that can be forwards deceleration) has a positive value. (Please read the relevant unit of a high school physics book.) –  user529758 Sep 22 '12 at 19:35
1  
You can prove what @H2CO3 is say very easily, hold your device upside down, what was the signs of your values will reverse, but the velocities won't. The numbers are the amount of force being applied moving the device away or from you. Not the speed and not the direction. Acceleration is rate of change of velocity. –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 22 '12 at 19:43
1  
@LukaP. If you had a signed speed, you could get direction from its sign (e. g. positive: forward, negative: backwards). –  user529758 Sep 22 '12 at 20:01

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