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I am planning to create a network measurement tool in 3G networks. I am just thinking in which language I should code- C or Python. Personally I love python, but i also feel that it is a bit slow and since i need to record the timestamps of packet sent and received and i need them to be as precise as possible(as soon as server has some packet to send, it should send and as soon as receiver receives a packet,the application should note the time stamp) , should I use Python or use C?

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closed as not a real question by Tichodroma, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Constantinius, bgporter, Donal Fellows Sep 23 '12 at 12:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Yes, you should use Python or C. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 22 '12 at 19:15
    
among python and C, which one? –  sahil Sep 22 '12 at 19:17
    
Why do you need to only use one of them? –  Donal Fellows Sep 23 '12 at 12:47
    
because i know network programming only in these two –  sahil Sep 24 '12 at 5:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your time is the most valuable, so code in whatever language you feel most comfortable. Python is slower than C in most cases, but on modern hardware it is still very fast. If you go the Python route, write your program, then use a profiler to figure out if you have a particular section slowing you down. If you can streamline it enough to meet your timing needs, great. If not, you can always write a function or class in C and link it in using swig.

We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. --Donald Knuth

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