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I have a test file:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

This command prints the last 4 lines of the file:

$ awk 'BEGIN{"wc -l < file" | getline b}{if(NR>b-4) print}' file
5 
6 
7 
8 
userpc@userpc-desktop

Now I want to do the same, but the command system ():

$ awk '{if( NR > (system("wc -l < file")-4) ) print}' file
8 
1 
8 
2 
8 
3 
8 
4 
8 
5 
8 
6 
8 
7 
8 
8 
userpc@userpc-desktop:

How to improve the last command system ()? I also want to print 4 last lines of the file. Thank you for your help.

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2  
You fork a wc for each line of the file??? Folks like you are the reason for 4GHz, Octocore CPUs with 64GB of RAM :-) –  Jens Sep 22 '12 at 19:34
    
Oh, and it doesn't work because system() returns an exit status (0 in this case -> always true), not the output of wc. The stdout ("8") is printed for each line, as you can see. –  Jens Sep 22 '12 at 19:59
    
Thank you for the clarification, but I still do not know how to improve the command system (). –  Tedee12345 Sep 22 '12 at 20:33
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

awk is definitely not the right tool for this. It's common to do: sed '1{N;N;N;}; N; D; $p', and you can do something similar with awk:

awk '{for( i=0;i<3;i++) a[i]=a[i+1];a[3]=$0} END {print a[0],a[1],a[2],a[3]}' OFS='\n'

Basically, you keep track of the last four lines seen, and print them all when you get to the end of the file. You can be a little more obscure and efficient with:

awk '{a[++i%4]=$0} END {print a[++i%4],a[++i%4],a[++i%4],a[++i%4]}' OFS='\n'

but, really, why would you?

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Good solution, but for printing a small number of lines. If I printed the more lines, the command will be longer. –  Tedee12345 Sep 22 '12 at 20:28
    
Actually, this is a terrible solution! But it does scale well if you use the second form with a for loop. ie awk '{a[++i%n]=$0} END {for(j=0;j<n;j++) print a[++i%n]}' n=256 –  William Pursell Sep 22 '12 at 20:33
    
This solution is good. Yet I will wait for suggestions to improve my second command system (). –  Tedee12345 Sep 22 '12 at 20:42
    
The solution in your comment would be the correct way to go. The principle is similar to my answer here. –  Dennis Williamson Sep 22 '12 at 22:00
    
Thank you for a good solution. –  Tedee12345 Sep 23 '12 at 6:23
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No need for awk, use tail:

$ tail -4 your_file
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Thank you, good answer, but the question is about awk, and the last command. –  Tedee12345 Sep 22 '12 at 19:22
    
Why complicated when an easy solution exists? –  user647772 Sep 22 '12 at 19:26
    
I ask because, to learn more about awk. –  Tedee12345 Sep 22 '12 at 19:31
    
Thank proposals for solutions. –  Tedee12345 Sep 23 '12 at 6:24
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If you just want a mechanism to improve your use of wc inside system, try:

awk 'NR > count-4' count=$( wc -l < file ) file

To do this more within awk;

awk 'NR==1{ c="wc -l < " FILENAME; c | getline count } NR > count-4' input

This uses NR==1 instead of BEGIN because FILENAME is not defined inside a BEGIN block. Note that neither of these use system from within awk, because there is no good way to get the output from system, but you can do ugly things like:

awk 'NR==1 { system( "wc -l > tmpfile < " FILENAME ); getline count < "tmpfile" }
    NR > count - 4' input

I cannot emphasize enough that this is merely an academic exercise. Do not use awk for this!

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Thank proposals for solutions. –  Tedee12345 Sep 23 '12 at 6:25
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One way using GNU awk:

awk '{ array[NR]=$0 } END { for (i=NR-3; i<=NR; i++) print array[i] }' file.txt

Results:

5
6
7
8
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Thank proposals for solutions. –  Tedee12345 Sep 23 '12 at 6:25
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tail is the right tool, but if you want to see it done in Awk:

awk '{b=b RS $0} b~/(\n.*){4}/{sub(/[^\n]*\n/,"",b)} END{print b}'
  1. Append line to buffer, separated by newline;
  2. If there are 4 newlines in buffer, remove first line from it;
  3. At end, print buffer.
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awk 'NR==5, NR==8{print NR} file

Prints from like 5th to the 8th line

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Here is another way using tac and awk:

$ tac file | awk 'NR==5{exit}1' | tac
5
6
7
8
  • tac to reverse the file.
  • awk to print first 4 lines and exit (good to have if your file is very large)
  • tac to reverse the file again
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