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Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log(i);
    }, 500)
}

In the above code, it will print only 100. I know the reason. But how do i send the current i value to the callback in setTimeout?

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Rob W, TimWolla, j0k, ChrisF Sep 22 '12 at 21:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

Use an anonymous function inside the loop to create a closure:

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {

  (function(i){

    window.setTimeout(function() {
      console.log(i);
    }, 500)

  })(i);

}

As you are passing the value to the function when calling, the value will be copied and each instance of the function will have its own copy that doesn't change when the loop counter changes.

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1  
Nit: The original callback the OP uses (function() { console.log(i); }) is already a closure. You are basically saying "Use a closure instead of a closure". The important point is that you are executing the function immediately, thus creating a new scope. –  Felix Kling Sep 22 '12 at 19:44
1  
@FelixKling: That capture captures the loop variable instead of copying it, so you need another closure, not a closure instead of the closure. –  Guffa Sep 22 '12 at 19:53
    
OK, you are not saying this, but to me it sounded like this. But no, technically you don't another closure, you need a new scope (in JS a function invocation) to capture the current value of the variable. As I said, this is all nitpick, but it is not correct to refer to immediately executed functions as "closures" only. That's not the main characteristic of that construct, creating a new scope is. If JavaScript had a different syntax for closures (like PHP, as opposed to "normal" functions), the difference would be more apparent. –  Felix Kling Sep 22 '12 at 22:50

setTimeout accepts parameters that are passed to the callback :

for (i=0;i<100;i++){
    setTimeout(function(i){
        console.log(i);
    },500, i)
}
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bt what if its some other callback. (setTimeout was juz an example). Any generic callback which already have some parameters by default. –  shahalpk Sep 22 '12 at 19:35
1  
If you can't do this, use the old closure solution (see all other answers). –  dystroy Sep 22 '12 at 19:35
2  
@Guffa This is node.js, not IE –  dystroy Sep 22 '12 at 19:36
1  
Since setTimeout is not part of ES and node.js has nothing to do with Mozilla, better link to the node.js documentation: nodejs.org/api/timers.html. –  Felix Kling Sep 22 '12 at 19:43
    
@dystroy: Right. Slipped my mind. –  Guffa Sep 22 '12 at 19:49

This works:

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            console.log(i);
        }, 500);
    })(i);
}​
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for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    setTimeout((function(i) {
        return function(){
            console.log(i);
        }
    })(i), 500)
}
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