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I have the following code:

public class test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Integer alpha = new Integer(1);
        Integer foo = new Integer(1);

        if(alpha == foo) {
            System.out.println("1. true");
        }

        if(alpha.equals(foo)) {
            System.out.println("2. true");
        }

    } 

}

The output is as follows:

2. true

However changing the type of an Integer object to int will produce a different output, for example:

public class test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Integer alpha = new Integer(1);
        int foo = 1;

        if(alpha == foo) {
            System.out.println("1. true");
        }

        if(alpha.equals(foo)) {
            System.out.println("2. true");
        }

    } 

}

The new output:

1. true
2. true

How come is this so? -- Why doesn't the first example code not output 1. true?

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5  
Are you sure that first output is not 2. true? Otherwise, nothing makes sense. –  ILMTitan Sep 22 '12 at 19:57
    
Yes, sorry, the formatting changed the 2 to a 1. –  Luke Taylor Sep 22 '12 at 19:59
2  
    
I want to add that in Eclipse you can use FindBugs to catch these mistakes. –  Hai Minh Nguyen Mar 29 '13 at 3:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

For reference types, == checks whether the references are equal, i.e. whether they point to the same object.

For primitive types, == checks whether the values are equal.

java.lang.Integer is a reference type. int is a primitive type.

Edit: If one operand is of primitive type, and the other of a reference type that unboxes to a suitable primitive type, == will compare values, not references.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this cleared me up. –  Luke Taylor Sep 22 '12 at 20:08
1  
+1 for question and answer. Just to make sure: in situation (Integer == int) or (int == Integer) it will always be unboxed to (int == int) not autoboxed to (Integer == Integer)? –  Pshemo Sep 22 '12 at 20:23
    
@Pshemo: Correct. –  meriton Sep 22 '12 at 20:50

== for objects checks if the references are the same that's why it returns false for Integers. For basic types however (ints, floats, ...) it checks for equality, that's why you get true.

I should mention that in the first case, where you compare an Integer and an int, the int is transformed into an Integer object (autoboxing), and then the reference comparison happens. Since they are different, it returns false.

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Integer objects are objects. This sounds logical, but is the answer to the question. Objects are made in Java using the new keyword, and then stored in the memory. When comparing, you compare the memory locations of the objects, not the value/properties of the objects.

Using the .equals() method, you actually compare the values/properties of objects, not their location in memory:

new Integer(1) == new Integer(1) returns false, while new Integer(1).equals(new Integer(1)) returns true.


ints are a primitive type of java. When you create an int, all that is referenced is the value. When you compare any primitive type in Java, all that is compared is the value, not the memory location. That is why 5 == 5 always returns true.

When you compare an Integer object to a primitive type, the object is cast to the primitive type, if possible. With an Integer and an int this is possible, so they are compared. That is why Integer(1).equals(1) returns true.

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+1 for clear explanation . –  U2Answer Nov 21 '13 at 6:44

Integer == int here auto boxing applied ( so Integer converted to int before comparision) so true.. but Integer == Integer here object comparison so as reference are different so false..

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What you'll use new Integer(1) to create new object, it creates a totally different object each time even though it has the same value. The '==' checks if the objects are same, not data values. In your case, you could have checked the value as follows :

if(alpha.intValue() == foo.intValue()) {
 // 
}
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First example: Using the == operator between objects checks for reference equality, and since you are comparing two different objects they do not equal.

Second example: When using the == between a wrapper type (Integer, Long, etc.) and a numeric type (int, long, etc.) the wrapper type is unboxed and the equality check is done between the two primitive numeric types (I.e. between int and int). The unboxing is part of binary numeric promotion, read more here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-5.html#jls-5.6.2

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