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I'm trying to call the class function A<F>::f() from within class S, but I'm getting the following errors when I instantiate an S object ( S<int>s ) and call it's f member function ( s.f() ) :

source.cpp: In instantiation of 'int S<F>::f() [with F = int]':
source.cpp:30:21: required from here
source.cpp:22:25: error: 'A<int>' is not an accessible base of 'S<int>'

Note that this works when I replace return A<F>::f(); inside the declaration of class S with return C<A, F>::f();. But I'm wondering why I can't do it the other way...

#include <iostream>

template <typename T> class A {
   public:
      int f();
};

template <typename T> int A<T>::f() {
   return sizeof(T);
}

template <template <typename> class E, typename D> class C : E<D> {
   public:
      int f() {
         return E<D>::f();
      }
};

template <typename F> class S : C<A, F> {
   public:
      int f() {
         return A<F>::f();
      }
};

int main() {

   S<int>s;

   std::cout << s.f();

}

Any help is appreciated and if you require further clarification please feel free to comment.

Update

Since this questions is resolved I guess I should post the code that actually worked:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T> class A {
   public:
      int f();
};

template <typename T> int A<T>::f() {
   return sizeof(T);
}

template <template <typename> class E, typename D> class C : public E<D> {
   public:
      int f() {
         return E<D>::f();
      }
};

class S : public C<A, int> {};

int main() {

   S s;

   std::cout << s.f(); // 4

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted
template <typename F> class S : C<A, F> 
                               ^

You don't specify a public inheritance, so it defaults to private, making the base classes inaccessible.

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Nevermind that last comment. It's working now that I replaced all the classes with public inheritance. –  template boy Sep 22 '12 at 20:22
    
Another idea would be to make them all structs so we can have default public inheritance. :) –  0x499602D2 Sep 22 '12 at 20:25

I think it is just a matter of using public class inheritance. Try with:

template <template<class> class E, typename D> class C : public E<D> {
   public:
      int f() {
         return E<D>::f();
      }
};

template <typename F> class S : public C<A, F> {
   public:
      int f() {
         return A<F>::f();
      }
};
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When you are trying to call A's version of f() you use the notation A<F>::f(). If A<F> had a static member function f() this function would, indeed, be called. However, A<F> only has a non-static member function f(), i.e., the call gets implicitly translated to this->A<F>::f(). However, S<F> doesn't have a A<F> as an accessible base (it is a private base of C<A, F>). From the looks of it you want to delegate to C<A, F>s version of f():

C<A, F>::f();

which should work because C<A, F> is an accesible base of S<int> or make the E<D> base of C accessible by making it either public or protected.

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Not sure this is true. In this case A<F> is a private base of the type. Lookup will find the injected type name before it gets to check the namespace level, so whether the member method in A is static or not does not really matter. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 23 '12 at 1:18

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