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This code gives warning about converting from double to int.

template <class T>
int f(T x)
{
    return x;    
}

int main()
{
    cout << f(3.5);
    return 0;
}

However, when I don't use templates, as the below, it can convert from double to int and print 3.

int f(float x)
{
    return x;    
}

int main()
{
    cout << f(3.5);
    return 0;    
}

Although, it can compile nontemplated sample, the templated sample cannot be compiled. I wonder why the compiler cannot make conversion when template is used.

Why can't the compiler convert the return type of the function from double to int when I use templates??

share|improve this question
    
Your non-template version is not equivalent. 3.5 has type double, not float. –  Charles Bailey Sep 22 '12 at 20:52
    
yeah , in both codes it gives the same warning , but in templated function it also gives error and cannot be compiled. However nontemplate sample can be compiled and run –  oiyio Sep 22 '12 at 20:52
1  
What error does the first code sample give and on which compiler? –  Charles Bailey Sep 22 '12 at 20:57
    
"instantiated from here " for line cout . And warning that i said . It can't compile. –  oiyio Sep 22 '12 at 21:04
    
@user1308990: "instantiated from here" is not an error. It's the compiler tracing back the template instantiation context. –  sbi Sep 22 '12 at 21:07

1 Answer 1

It can, but it might also suspect that you made a mistake. A warning is just that - telling you that there might be a problem.

You can tell the compiler that the conversion is on purpose by adding a cast

return static_cast<int>(x);
share|improve this answer
    
Although, it can compile nontemplated sample , the templated sample cannot be compiled. I wonder why the compiler cannot make conversion when template is used –  oiyio Sep 22 '12 at 20:55
    
It can, but it doesn't want to. :-) Obviously, the compiler writer is more concerned about possible errors in templated code. A warning is just an indication that there might be a problem. By spelling the conversion out explicitly, you tell the compiler what your intentions are. –  Bo Persson Sep 22 '12 at 20:59
    
When we say explicitly , it's OK. But it cannot convert automatically. I think it's a harsh rule of C++ –  oiyio Sep 22 '12 at 21:02
    
It can convert, it just also wants to tell you that there might be a problem. Not all T's are implicitly convertible to an int, right? –  Bo Persson Sep 22 '12 at 21:05
    
@user1308990 - It's your compiler, not C++. Multiple versions of GNU C++, multiple versions of clang have no problem with your code. –  David Hammen Sep 22 '12 at 21:06

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