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Assume there is an object that initialises like so

- (void)doInit
{
    NSLog(@"In BaseClass init");
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    [self doInit];

    return self;
}

and it has a subclass which is inited in a similar way

- (void)doInit
{
    NSLog (@"In SubClass init");
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    [self doInit];

    return self;
}

Now if I create an instance of child class then I receive the following output:

In SubClass init
In SubClass init

when really, what I meant to happen is

In BaseClass init
In SubClass init

Is there a way to mark doInit to say that it shouldn't be overridden or do I need to create a unique name for all methods in a subclass?

I'm not entirely sure how I haven't come across this issue before, but there you go.

Edit:

I understand why this is happening, I hadn't expected that the base class would be able to call the overridden function.

I also can't just call [super doInit]; from the Subclass method because the BaseClass still needs to call doInit so that creating an instance of BaseClass will still work. If I called [super doInit], I'd still end up getting SubClass's doInit called twice.

It appears the answer is no and I'll just have to uniquely name each doInit like doBaseClassInit and doSubClassInit.

share|improve this question
    
So what you want is not necessarily to prevent subclasses from overriding, but make it so that BaseClass always runs its implementation of doInit called from init? If it's as narrow a use case as that then you can probably use the Objective-C run time functions to help you. If you generally need all calls to doInit to call only to the BaseClass's implementation, there's not any language feature that I know of that can help you. –  Carl Veazey Sep 22 '12 at 22:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have a method that you don't want to by dynamically bound (i.e. don't want a subclass method to be called if it exists), you need to do it as a C function instead. So, you could do this instead:

In the base class:

static void DoInit(BaseClass *self)
{
    NSLog(@"In BaseClass init");
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        DoInit(self);
    }
    return self;
}

in the subclass:

static void DoInit(SubClass *self)
{
    NSLog(@"In SubClass init");
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        DoInit(self);
    }
    return self;
}

Note that both the DoInit methods are marked as static, so they are only visible each compilation unit (.m file) and don't conflict with each other.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah thank you. And then obviously to access any iVars I need to just use self->iVar. –  iain Sep 24 '12 at 14:05

You could, perhaps, try something like this in your base class. It would mean any time the init implementation inside BaseClass executed, the doInit implementation for BaseClass would be called.

- (void)doInit
{
    NSLog(@"In BaseClass init");
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];

    Class baseClass = [BaseClass class];
    SEL selector = @selector(doInit);
    IMP baseClassImplementation = class_getInstanceMethod(baseClass, selector);
    baseClassImplementation(self, selector);

    return self;
}

As I mentioned in my comment, if that's the narrowness of your need this should work as it gets around the dynamic method lookup involved with sending a message. Hope this helps!

EDIT:

Disclaimer - if you're in this situation it's probably not a good sign for the longevity of your design. This technique will get you up and running for now but please document it carefully, and consider ways to refactor your code so this is no longer used. Consider fixes like these to really be used only when extremely urgent.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was essentially what I was wanting and it's a neat trick, but I guess ultimately it's more long winded than simply renaming doInit to baseClassDoInit. –  iain Sep 22 '12 at 22:36
    
Yeah, unlike some other languages there is no way to know until run time what implementation of a method will be used to respond to any given message. But the run time functions let you at least go look for the implementation you want. Probably in most cases you are better off using separate names for the methods, but glad to hear this helped you. –  Carl Veazey Sep 22 '12 at 22:46
4  
This will work, but it is an awful thing to do. What if the subclass's override causes a side effect that the implementation of other methods in the subclass rely upon? boom app no worky. –  bbum Sep 22 '12 at 22:55
    
@bbum certainly if the OP is in this situation it's not a good sign. I felt he'd gotten enough "Don't do that" from the other answers, but I'll add a disclaimer for future readers. –  Carl Veazey Sep 22 '12 at 23:31
    
I'm not sure how it's a bad sign. All I was trying to do was reduce the amount of code in the various init/initWithFrame/initWithCoder methods and put all the repeated code into a separate doInit method each could call. The problem then being that I tried to do the same thing with the subclasses due to the base methods being overridden. I had assumed that only methods in a class's interface section were able to be overridden and that other methods were private to their implementation section. Like a static function in C is private to the .c file it is contained in –  iain Sep 24 '12 at 14:13

The reason why you are not getting the "In BaseClass init" console message is because your subclass is not calling the super's implementation of doInit.

If you don't want doInit overridden the 'best' way to avoid doing so is to not publish the existence of this method. Remove it from your header and uniquely name the method so that a collision is unlikely. For example, many of the private methods in Apple's frameworks have a leading underscore. So, for example, you could call your method _doInit and it will be very unlikely that a subclass accidentally create it's own overiding implementation.

share|improve this answer
1  
apple reserves the leading underscore for private methods, you can add a trailing underscore or double leading instead though –  wattson12 Sep 22 '12 at 21:47
1  
As of WWDC 2012, Apple does not reserve them. –  Wayne Hartman Sep 22 '12 at 21:59
    
hmmm, i didnt notice that there, what video did they say that in? their coding guidelines still say its reserved –  wattson12 Sep 22 '12 at 22:16
1  
That is not true. ivars with leading underscores are no longer reserved, but method names sure are. –  jfortmann Sep 23 '12 at 1:26
4  
Ivars with leading underscores were never reserved. What’s changed is that they are now explicitly encouraged as backing for properties. –  Jens Ayton Sep 23 '12 at 8:47

Nope, there's no enforceable way to prevent a subclass from overriding a method. The best you can do is to avoid putting it in the public header file for the class so someone is not likely to try to override it. If the method has to be public, you just put a note in the documentation for the method that it shouldn't be overridden or that subclasses should call super's implementation whichever the case may be. You'll find these kind of instructions all over in the documentation for Apple's own classes.

share|improve this answer
    
it was more that I wanted to use the same method name in both base and subclass, but that the implementation would remain private to each class. BaseClass would use BaseClass's doInit, and SubClass would use SubClass's doInit. But thanks anyway. –  iain Sep 22 '12 at 22:16

If you want your subclass to use the baseclass version of doInit then in the subclass don't declare a doInit method. Here's what I mean:

ClassA:

@interface ClassA : 

-(void) doInit;
-(id) init;

@implementation

-(void) doInit {
    NSLog(@"ClassA doInit");
}

-(id) init {
    self = [super init];

    if (self != NULL)
        [self doInit];

    return self;
}

ClassB

@interface ClassB : ClassA

-(id) init;

@implementation

-(id) init {
    self = [super init];

    if (self != NULL)
        [self doInit];

    return self;
}

And really you don't need to override the init method as well unless there's some special code that you want that class to do.

share|improve this answer
    
No, what I wanted was BaseClass to use BaseClass's doInit, and SubClass to use SubClass's doInit –  iain Sep 22 '12 at 22:15

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