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I have lineget function that returns char *(it detects '\n') and NULL on EOF. In main() I'm trying to recognize particular words from that line. I used strtok:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char *line, *ptr;
    FILE *infile;
    FILE *outfile;
    char **helper = NULL;
    int strtoks = 0;
    void *temp;

    infile=fopen(argv[1],"r");
    outfile=fopen(argv[2],"w");

    while(((line=readline(infile))!=NULL))
    {
        ptr = strtok(line, " ");

        temp = realloc(helper, (strtoks)*sizeof(char *));
        if(temp == NULL) {
            printf("Bad alloc error\n");
            free(helper);
            return 0;
        } else {
            helper=temp;
        }
        while (ptr != NULL) {
            strtoks++;
            fputs(ptr, outfile);
            fputc(' ', outfile);
            ptr = strtok(NULL, " ");
            helper[strtoks-1] = ptr;
        }
        /*fputs(line, outfile);*/
        free(line);
    }
    fclose(infile);
    fclose(outfile);
    return 0;
}

Now I have no idea how to put every of tokenized words into an array (I created char ** helper for that purpose), so that it can be used in qsort like qsort(helper, strtoks, sizeof(char*), compare_string);.

Ad. 2 Even if it would work - I don't know how to clear that line, and proceed to sorting next one. How to do that?

I even crashed valgrind (with the code presented above) -> "valgrind: the 'impossible' happened: Killed by fatal signal"

Where is the mistake ?

share|improve this question
    
Is the function lineget() as in the opening spiel or readline() as in the code? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '12 at 22:24
1  
I'm fairly sure Peter means readline. –  1'' Sep 22 '12 at 22:26
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most obvious problem (there may be others) is that you're reallocating helper to the value of strtoks at the beginning of the line, but then incrementing strtoks and adding to the array at higher values of strtoks. For instance, on the first line, strtoks is 0, so temp = realloc(helper, (strtoks)*sizeof(char *)); leaves helper as NULL, but then you try to add every word on that line to the helper array.

I'd suggest an entirely different approach which is conceptually simpler:

char buf[1000]; // or big enough to be bigger than any word you'll encounter
char ** helper;
int i, numwords;

while(!feof(infile)) { // most general way of testing if EOF is reached, since EOF 
                       // is just a macro and may not be machine-independent.
    for(i = 0; (ch = fgetc(infile)) != ' ' && ch != '\n'; i++) { 
        // get chars one at a time until we hit a space or a newline
        buf[i] = ch; // add char to buffer
    }
    buf[i + 1] = '\0' // terminate with null byte
    helper = realloc(++numwords * sizeof(char *)); // expand helper to fit one more word
    helper[numwords - 1] = strdup(buffer) // copy current contents of buffer to the just-created element of helper
}

I haven't tested this so let me know if it's not correct or there's anything you don't understand. I've left out the opening and closing of files and the freeing at the end (remember you have to free every element of helper before you free helper itself).

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that the use of realloc() with 0 in strtoks is almost certainly the problem. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '12 at 22:38
    
Chosen as best, although I decided to take completely another approach. Simple answer providing much information. –  Peter Kowalski Sep 23 '12 at 13:15
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As you can see in strtok's prototype:

char * strtok ( char * str, const char * delimiters );

...str is not const. What strtok actually does is replace found delimiters by null bytes (\0) into your str and return a pointer to the beginning of the token.

Per example:

char in[] = "foo bar baz";
char *toks[3];

toks[0] = strtok(in, " ");
toks[1] = strtok(NULL, " ");
toks[2] = strtok(NULL, " ");

printf("%p %s\n%p %s\n%p %s\n", toks[0], toks[0], toks[1], toks[1], 
                                toks[2], toks[2]);
printf("%p %s\n%p %s\n%p %s\n", &in[0], &in[0], &in[4], &in[4], 
                                &in[8], &in[8]);

Now look at the results:

0x7fffd537e870 foo
0x7fffd537e874 bar
0x7fffd537e878 baz
0x7fffd537e870 foo
0x7fffd537e874 bar
0x7fffd537e878 baz

As you can see, toks[1] and &in[4] point to the same location: the original str has been modified, and in reality all tokens in toks point to somewhere in str.

In your case your problem is that you free line:

free(line);

...invalidating all your pointers in helper. If you (or qsort) try to access helper[0] after freeing line, you end up accessing freed memory.

You should copy the tokens instead, e.g.:

ptr = strtok(NULL, " ");
helper[strtoks-1] = malloc(strlen(ptr) + 1);
strcpy(helper[strtoks-1], ptr);

Obviously, you will need to free each element of helper afterwards (in addition to helper itself).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You! Also tried this with strdup, but eventually decided to take another approach. –  Peter Kowalski Sep 23 '12 at 13:16
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You should be getting a 'Bad alloc' error because:

char **helper = NULL;
int strtoks = 0;

...

while ((line = readline(infile)) != NULL)  /* Fewer, but sufficient, parentheses */
{
    ptr = strtok(line, " ");

    temp = realloc(helper, (strtoks)*sizeof(char *));
    if (temp == NULL) {
        printf("Bad alloc error\n");
        free(helper);
        return 0;
    }

This is because the value of strtoks is zero, so you are asking realloc() to free the memory pointed at by helper (which was itself a null pointer). One outside chance is that your library crashes on realloc(0, 0), which it shouldn't but it is a curious edge case that might have been overlooked. The other possibility is that realloc(0, 0) returns a non-null pointer to 0 bytes of data which you are not allowed to dereference. When your code dereferences it, it crashes. Both returning NULL and returning non-NULL are allowed by the C standard; don't write code that crashes regardless of which behaviour realloc() shows. (If your implementation of realloc() does not return a non-NULL pointer for realloc(0, 0), then I'm suspicious that you aren't showing us exactly the code that managed to crash valgrind (which is a fair achievement — congratulations) because you aren't seeing the program terminate under control as it should if realloc(0, 0) returns NULL.)

You should be able to avoid that problem if you use:

    temp = realloc(helper, (strtoks+1) * sizeof(char *));

Don't forget to increment strtoks itself at some point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out the reasons behind that critical error. –  Peter Kowalski Sep 23 '12 at 13:17
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