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I have a Class (MyFactory) which produces objects of type A. (myFactory will be an instance) I want to allow users to extends the class A (to a Class B, for example), and override virtual methods of A.

For example, users who don't want to extend A :

A* myObject = myFactoryInstance.createObject();

And my current trick for users which extends A with B :

B* myObjectPrepare = new B()
myFactoryInstance.setNextObject( myObjectPrepare );
A* myObject = myFactoryInstance.createObject(); // Will look for a "next_object"
     /* Here, myObject (which is myObjectPrepare modified by createObject) 
        methods will dynamically link to B class methods. */

My goal is to facilitate this operation.

.

I tried :

  template <class T>
  void MyFactory::set_requests_class() {
      new T(); 
      /* I don't want an instance, now. Just memorize class type
         at compilation time, and make instances of T along exec
      */
  }

(usage : set_requests_class(); Problem : I don't want to produce instance)


That could be a solution :

myFactoryInstance.createObject<YourObjectTypeHere>();

But I don't want to make the template parameter mandatory (default parameter for an attribute is only possible since c++11) : I want to keep it very simple for users who don't want to extends A. I CAN'T modify "createObject" signature, for the same reason.

(My future trick will be to instanciate the B object, keep it as attribute and clone it for new instances)

Thank you in advance (any suggestion will be appreciated)

share|improve this question
    
Future user (it will be a lib) could create X subclass of A, so they won't want to create a new Factory per sublcass. Moreover, myFactory is not only a factory. –  Neozaru Sep 22 '12 at 22:07
    
That was my first idea, but a same "MyFactor" (it's not its real name) should be able to manage several subclass of A (A for generic usage, and B,C,D... for specific usage in same context) –  Neozaru Sep 22 '12 at 22:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to just overload createObject. See this example:

class A
{
public:
    A() { std::cout << "A"; }
};

class Subclass1 : public A
{
public:
    Subclass1() { std::cout << "Subclass1"; }
};

class AFactory
{
public:
    A* createInstance()
    {
        return new A();
    }
    template<typename Tsubclass>
    A* createInstance()
    {
        return new Tsubclass();
    }
};

int main()
{
    AFactory fact;
    A* pa = fact.createInstance();// creates A
    A* psubclass1 = fact.createInstance<Subclass1>();// creates Subclass1

    delete pa;
    delete psubclass1;
    return 0;
}

And if you need to keep your design, where you set the type to create before you actually create the objects, then you can do it using a secondary factory like below. It's not a very nice design though; basically the factory class now basically just acts as a wrapper that casts the result. Seems like there's a better design from the outside.

struct A
{
    A() { std::cout << "A"; }
};

struct Subclass1 : A
{
    Subclass1() { std::cout << "Subclass1"; }
};

struct GenericAFactoryBase
{
    virtual A* createInstance() = 0;
};

template<typename Tsubclass>
struct GenericAFactory : GenericAFactoryBase
{
    A* createInstance() { return new Tsubclass(); }
};

struct AFactory
{
    std::shared_ptr<GenericAFactoryBase> genericFactory;

    AFactory()
    {
        genericFactory.reset(new GenericAFactory<A>());
    }

    A* createInstance()
    {
        return genericFactory->createInstance();
    }
    template<typename Tsubclass>
    void SetType()
    {
        genericFactory.reset(new GenericAFactory<Tsubclass>());
    }
};

int main()
{
    AFactory fact;
    A* pa = fact.createInstance();// creates A

    fact.SetType<Subclass1>();
    A* psubclass1 = fact.createInstance();// creates Subclass1

    delete pa;
    delete psubclass1;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. I named my class "MyFactory" in order to try to simply, but I wasn't specific : The method "createObject" have 50 to 100 variants ("createWithDuck","createWithPoney", etc ...). I think I have to do some refactoring, and separate object creation and object edition –  Neozaru Sep 22 '12 at 22:18
    
Using my design, you will just have two createObject methods, and you would call it like createObject<Duck>();, createObject<Pony>();, etc. –  tenfour Sep 22 '12 at 22:30
    
You saved my time with "GenericAFactoryBase" which allow to set factory as member without specific <parameter>. Thanks a lot for your time, and all your responses. Accepted. –  Neozaru Sep 22 '12 at 23:38

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