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What is memory space of arrays declared in kernel? For example in following code I declare array a. Where this array will be located? I'm confused between local memory and registers? If it is in registers then how exactly they are mapped?

__device__ int ptr=0;  

__global__ void a()  
{  
    int b[9][9];                                         
    atomicAdd(&ptr,1);  
    b[0][0]=ptr;                                       
    for(int i=1;i<9;i++)  
    {  
        for(int j=1;j<9;j++)  
        {  
            b[i][j]=b[i-1][j-1]+1;  
        }  
    }  
    ptr=b[7][7]+1;                                                 
}     

int main()  
{
    a<<<1,1>>>();  
    return 0;  
}

In general, is there any way to see memory space of each variable through .ptx files? I compiled this with --ptxas-options=-v but no useful info. I looked .o files but it doesn't contain what i want. All I want is location of variables used in kernel.

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3  
Such an array is thread-local data and will therefore be stored in local memory by default. Depending on access pattern and size, and subject to compiler optimization, it may be placed in registers. For the data to wind up in registers, all accesses must use compile-time constant indices, and the array must be "small", as determined by a compiler heuristic. –  njuffa Sep 22 '12 at 23:49
    
how to know the actual location of these allocations? –  username_4567 Sep 23 '12 at 1:00
3  
Look at the PTX (you can use --keep ro save the intermediate PTX). You will either see loads from local memory, or register accesses. On second thought, the allocation to register may also happen in the compiler backend which translated PTX to SASS machine code. You can examined the generated SASS with cuobjdump --dump-sass. –  njuffa Sep 23 '12 at 3:21
1  
@username_4567: If that is the real code you compiled, it shouldn't contain anything - the kernel contains no real code, and the compiler will emit a null stub for the kernel. Use a real example and the behaviour will be different. –  talonmies Sep 23 '12 at 9:40
1  
@username_4567: Your code of 2 hours ago still compiles to a null kernel. Please think these questions though a bit more before you ask them. –  talonmies Sep 23 '12 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

Thread's private array definitely is stored at local memory space, in the DRAM off-the-chip, and maybe cached in memory hierarchy. Generally, non-array variable are considered as virtual registers in PTX and the number of registers in PTX are unlimited. However, obviously all these virtual registers are not mapped to physical registers. A PTX postprocessor spills some registers to local space according to the micro-architecture flags specified for NVCC, and optimizes the register usage.

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I'm answering this question as I've got confirm view from one of the presentation in GTC. So, Compiler will try to put these arrays in registers if they are small enough. If they cannot accommodate in register file it will be spilled to local memory. But primary storage area is registers!!

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