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Adobe are silently working on a new version of their C++ to Flash compiler (codenamed Alchemy)

The current flash player seems to already support running code compiled by it and there is evidence that complex C++ codebases such as the Unreal Engine have been ported to it with very good results: http://gaming.adobe.com/technologies/flascc/ (try the demo)

I'm curious how does Alchemy 2 achieve the near native execution speed?

I've read before how Alchemy 1 rewrites memory loads and stores in the C program to use few Alchemy-specific opcodes [1] and I can certainly imagine how this still has a significant overhead compared to the native code.

Does Alchemy 2 use some more general x86 sandboxing technique similarly to Google Native Client?

[1] http://ncannasse.fr/blog/virtual_memory_api

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I shouldn't have included the C++ tag probably. Are you sure your answer applies for Alchemy 2? Your description sounds suspiciously like what Alchemy 1 is doing, but the performance improvements are quite dramatic and Alchemy 2 requires runtime that was shipped in flash player 11.1 (so something has changed). –  Hazy Joe Aardvark Sep 23 '12 at 10:00
    
@wvxvw What do you mean only paying customers? Does that mean I cannot use Flascc for free like I've uses pure AS3 until now? I think the reason the question was closed is that is not based on an actual problem the op faced and was more about satisfying curiosity. It is by no means a bad question. It may not be suitable for the site. –  Arthur Wulf White Oct 13 '12 at 9:25
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closed as not a real question by Seth Carnegie, Don Roby, Ɓukasz Niemier, Jonathan Leffler, Adam Wagner Sep 23 '12 at 2:26

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