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I am trying to return IEnumerable<IMyInterface>. I have a class, MyClass:IMyInterface that I return from a function.

IEnumerable<IMyInterface> test() {
    tmpList = new List<MyClass>();
    tmp1 = new MyClass();
    tmp2 = new MyClass();
    tmpList.Add(tmp1);
    tmpList.Add(tmp2);
    return tmpList;
}

Compiler will not permit, which seems odd to me since MyClass:MyInterface. Compiler gives error along the lines of 'cannot implicitly convert type System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<MyClass> to System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<IMyInterface. An explicit conversion exists. Are you missing a cast?'

I can't perform return (IEnumerable<IMyInterface>)tmp without cast exception at runtime. What am I missing? I would expect returning IEnumerable of interface should work fine.

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1  
MyClass is a IMyInterface, which is not the same as IEnumerable<IMyInterface>. What are you trying to accomplish? –  John Saunders Sep 22 '12 at 23:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should do this:

IEnumerable<IMyInterface> test() {
    tmpList = new List<IMyInterface>();  // this is the important bit
    tmp1 = new MyClass();
    tmp2 = new MyClass();
    tmpList.Add(tmp1);
    tmpList.Add(tmp2);
    return tmpList;
}

Alternatively, you could do this:

return tmpList.Cast<IMyInterface>(); // requires using System.Linq in usings
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This was a great suggestion. I intentionally gave a trivial example. In my "real" code I am using a factory pattern that permits me to generate List<T>, where T must be a newable object (not interface). So I went with the Cast<IMyInterface> -- works beautifully! –  goldfinger Sep 23 '12 at 0:36

Use yield return instead of only return. This turns a simple object into an enumeration of objects!

IEnumerable<IMyInterface> test() {
    yield return new MyClass();
    yield return new MyClass();
    yield return new MyClass();
}

Creates an enumeration of three objects implementing the interface.


EDIT:

Or change the return type of the method to return a single item.

IMyInterface test() {
    return new MyClass();
}
share|improve this answer
    
One containing only a single object. Is that what the OP wants? –  John Saunders Sep 22 '12 at 23:24
    
No idea waht he wants. Added an example without IEnumerable<>. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Sep 22 '12 at 23:30
    
Probably helpful to also point out that the function will not actually be run until the enumeration is accessed. Kinda a gotcha of yield. –  Mike Christensen Sep 22 '12 at 23:33
    
A gotcha or an advantage! Often it is useful to have a lazy execution. If you break a foreach loop prematurely (e.g. because you found the item you need), the rest of the enumerator won't be executed at all. This can save valuable resources for long enumerations. An enumeration could be endless. Think of one calculating and returning prime numbers. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Sep 22 '12 at 23:44
    
Oh a gotcha and an advantage! This basically makes LINQ work, right? And anything implemented with the fluent pattern.. –  Mike Christensen Sep 22 '12 at 23:49

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