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I'm having a few issues coding for Conway's Game of Life in C++. I feel like I have a good start, I just need some direction. First, I keep getting a just a blank console when I'm trying to run the program. And also I'm not really sure the best way to code for the places on the board that do not have the full eight neighbors. Any help would be appreciated.

Rules:

You will "hard code" a starting configuration. The user need not be able to provide a different starting configuration (that would just complicate your program).

Suggestions: Look for stable configurations. That is, look for communities that repeat patterns continually. The number of configurations in the repetition is called the period. There are configurations that are fixed, which continue without change. A possible project is to find such configurations.

Hints: Define a void function named generation that takes the vector we call world (call-by-reference or using a pointer), which contains the current (or initial) configuration. The function scans the vector and modifies the cells, marking the cells with births and deaths in accord with the rules listed earlier. This involves examining each cell in turn, either killing the cell, letting it live, or if the cell is empty, deciding whether a cell should be born. Note that the game will not work if your code counts neighbors in the same vector it is modifying. A copy of the world vector must be created before it is modified, and this copy is used to count neighbors, while cells are turned on or off in the original vector.

There should be a function display that accepts the vector world and displays the grid on the screen. Some sort of time delay is appropriate between calls to generation and display. To do this, your program should generate and display the next generation when you press Return/Enter. You are at liberty to automate this (put in a real time delay, and not wait for the user to press a key), but automation is not necessary for the program.

If you want to "delay" the display of your grid, rather than wait for the user to type something and press enter before displaying the next grid, then you will need to pause or "sleep" your program somehow. If you are using Microsoft Windows, do this:

We define each cell to have eight neighbor cells. The neighbors of a cell are the cells directly above, below, to the right, to the left, diagonally above to the right and left, and diagonally below to the right and left. Be careful when checking for neighbors on the edges; you can decide whether an edge cell has alive or dead neighbors beyond the edge.

If an occupied cell has zero or one neighbors, it dies of loneliness. If an occupied cell has more than three neighbors, it dies of overcrowding.

If an empty cell has exactly three occupied neighbor cells, there is a birth of a new cell to replace the empty cell.

Births and deaths are instantaneous and occur at the changes of generation. A cell dying for whatever reason may help cause birth, but a new born cell cannot resurrect a cell that is dying, nor will a cell's death prevent the death of another, say, by reducing the local population.

My Code so Far:

/*

Filename: main.cpp
Author: Eric Beiersdorfer
Version: 20120920
Description:

*/

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<cstdlib>

using namespace std;

/*Change the values of your world matrix*/
#define ROWS 21
#define COLS 80

/*Change the values for dead or alive*/
#define DEAD  ' '
#define ALIVE '*'

/*Function Prototype for generation*/
void generation (vector< vector<char> > &world, vector< vector<char> > &world_copy);

/*Function Prototype for display*/
void display(vector< vector<char> >);

int main()
{

    vector< vector<char> > world(ROWS, vector<char>(COLS, DEAD));
    vector< vector<char> > world_copy(ROWS, vector<char>(COLS, DEAD));

    /*Set ALIVE cells*/
    world[1][1] = world[1][2] = world[1][3] = ALIVE;

    while(true);
    {
        /*Clear screen and display world*/
        system("cls");
        display(world);

        /*Wait*/
        usleep(8000);

        /*Update World*/
        generation(world, world_copy);

    }
    return 0;
}

/*Copy the contents of world into world_copy*/
void generation (vector< vector<char> > &world, vector< vector<char> > &world_copy)
{
    int ALIVE_count = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++)
        {
            /*Checks neighbors for life*/
            if(world_copy[i-1][j+1] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i][j+1] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i+1][j+1] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i-1][j] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i+1][j] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i-1][j-1] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i][j-1] == ALIVE)
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }
            if(world_copy[i+1][j-1])
            {
                ALIVE_count++;
            }

            /*Rule Section*/
            /*Death by loneliness. 0 or 1 neighbors.*/
            if (world_copy[i][j] == ALIVE && (ALIVE_count == 0 || ALIVE_count == 1))
            {
                world[i][j] = world_copy[i][j];
                world[i][j] == DEAD;
            }
            /*Live to next generation. 2 or 3 neighbors.*/
            else if(world_copy[i][j] == ALIVE && (ALIVE_count == 2 || ALIVE_count == 3))
            {
                world[i][j] = world_copy[i][j];
                world[i][j] == ALIVE;
            }
            /*Death by overcrowding. More than 3 neighbors.*/
            else if (world_copy[i][j] == ALIVE && ALIVE_count > 3)
            {
                world[i][j] = world_copy[i][j];
                world[i][j] == DEAD;
            }
            /*Birth. Exactly 3 neighbors.*/
            else if (world_copy[i][j] == ALIVE && ALIVE_count ==3)
            {
                world[i][j] = world_copy[i][j];
                world[i][j] == ALIVE;
            }
        }
    }
}

/*Display the world*/
void display(vector< vector<char> > &world)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; i < COLS; j++)
        {
            cout << world[i][j];
        }

        cout << endl;
    }
}

Update:

Found an issue in the while statement of main. I had a ; after the while:

while(true);
{
/*Clear screen and display world*/
system("cls");
display(world);

/*Wait*/
Sleep(800);

/*Update World*/
generation(world, world_copy);
} 

I went ahead and took that out but now I am getting an undefined reference to 'display in the while loop.

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2 Answers 2

Improper Loop Condition

void display(vector< vector<char> > &world)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; i < COLS; j++)
        {
            cout << world[i][j];
        }

        cout << endl;
    }
}

should be:

void display(vector< vector<char> > &world)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++)
        {
            cout << world[i][j];
        }

        cout << endl;
    }
}

Note the condition clause of the inner FOR loop.

Improper while() loop termination

while(true);

should be:

while(true)

Improper Assignment Operation

This pattern is repeated many times in the code. the first assignment is kept. the second isn't done at all. It is a conditional expression evaluation. What looks like this:

world[i][j] = world_copy[i][j];
world[i][j] == DEAD;

should likely look like this (note I am guessing on the copy being the prior state. not sure what your intention is here):

world_copy[i][j] = world[i][j];
world[i][j] = DEAD;

Undefined symbol display() during link

The prototype for the function at the top of the file is:

void display(vector< vector<char> > );

Yet the implementation below is:

void display(vector< vector<char> >& )

Note the reference parameter in the second, the by-val parameter in the first. Different parameter lists = different signatures. Likely the second is what you had in mind, so change the prototype (the first) to match the implementation (the second).

Array Index Out of Bounds

There are several places in your code (the generation() function specifically) that index beyond the end of the allocated vectors. For example,

/*Checks neighbors for life*/
if(world_copy[i-1][j+1] == ALIVE)
{
    ALIVE_count++;
}
if(world_copy[i][j+1] == ALIVE)
{
    ALIVE_count++;
}
if(world_copy[i+1][j+1] == ALIVE)

Those [j+1] and [i+1] indexes will fault your process (if you're lucky) as soon as they hit the conditon of (i==(ROWS-1)) or (j==(COLS-1)), since ROWS and COLS are the allocated size of your battlefield. Likewise for [i-1] and [j-1] when i and j are at the starts of their loops (i=0 or j=0)

There are a number of ways to address this, from logic to not check what would be overruns (easy to detect) to framing your field with a dead-zone that is never touched (more involved, but more fun to code).

Bottom line: You MUST learn to effectively debug your programs. If you think professional engineers just spew correct code, think again. On average we spend half our time (literally) debugging written code. If you find yourself spending any less, odds are you're not giving your code the due diligence it requires (and frankly deserves).

share|improve this answer
    
If it's not clear what the difference is, there's an i in the first version...it took me a moment to see that, so I want to point it out more explicitly. –  Code-Apprentice Sep 22 '12 at 23:46
    
yeah, I'll edit and put both loops in. thanks. –  WhozCraig Sep 23 '12 at 0:00
    
Thanks Craig. I completely skimmed over that. However I'm still not getting anything from the console except the blinking cursor. Any thoughts? –  malibubts Sep 23 '12 at 23:37
    
Many. I've substantially updated this analysis. Please review some of the things above (all of them actually), and look for more. This should get you a hellva lot further than you were. –  WhozCraig Sep 24 '12 at 16:30

I'm not really sure the best way to code for the places on the board that do not have the full eight neighbors

You should probably treat these as special cases. For example, code i=0 separately from your loop which can start at i = 1.

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