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I am thinking of making an enum for my permissions types instead of storing them all as true or false values in db.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test addEdit = Test.AddEdit;
        bool hasEdit = addEdit.HasFlag(Test.Edit);
        bool hasAdd = addEdit.HasFlag(Test.Add);
        bool hasDelete = addEdit.HasFlag(Test.Delete);
        Console.WriteLine(hasEdit);
        Console.WriteLine(hasAdd);
        Console.WriteLine(hasDelete);
        Console.Read();
    }
}

   [Flags]
    public enum Test
    {
        Add = 0,
        Edit = 1,
        Delete = 2,
        AddEdit = Add | Edit
    }

So I made this. The funny thing that I found is that addEdit varaible shows only the value of "Edit" when looking at it through the VS debugger. At first I thought it was not storing both values.

I used the hasFlag method and sure enough it knows about both values.

So is it a bug or what?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

MSDN mentions that all values in enums with [Flags] should be in powers of 2 (i.e. 1,2,4,8.....).

You can assign 0 if you have a 'None' enumeration.

Check the section titled "Guidelines for FlagsAttribute and Enum" in [Flags] documentation.

When you OR a value with zero (0), result will be the same value again. So, in your case, 'AddEdit' will result in to '1' which represents 'Edit' in the 'Test' enum.

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AddEdit== Edit == 1. So debugger does not know if you want to convert 1 to "Edit" or "AddEdit".

Most likely you want

[Flags] 
public enum Test 
{ 
    None = 0,
    Add = 1, 
    Edit = 2, 
    Delete = 4, 
    AddEdit = Add | Edit 
} 
share|improve this answer

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