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My ultimate goal for this assignment is to create a graph data structure using adjacency list.

The command line arguments will the be in the format "A B 3", where and A and B are two vertices and 3 is the edge weight b test etween them.

Now, in the below code, I am trying to just iterate through all the command line arguments via the the argv[ ] and create a new array(attempting to allocate dynamically as the number of arguments are unknown) with all the unique names of vertices.

The goal of this is to get all the unique names ofcourse so it is easy to set the names of vertices when creating them and also will tell me how many vertices to create.

I might have syntax errors, as I am very new to C language and have never done dynamic memory allocation before. To test the code I am trying to just print the contents of the new array named vertex_name (expecting it to be a bunch of strings). So I am just using simple printf statement to print the first one or two elements. But I get some random two single chars, even when my command line args were 2 words like for example "Chicago Illinois 25". Can someone please help me with this? I have already spent too many hours trying to figure this out. And if possible, let me know if this approach is acceptable or unnecessary.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "graph.h"

/* implement the functions you declare in graph.h here */

void add_edge (vertex_t **vtxhead, char *v1_name, char *v2_name, int weight) {
    /* add your implementation here */
}

/* 
 *Compares args array with a new array that is dynamically allocated and  contains unique 

*/
char* unique_name(char *argv[], int argc)
     {
       int i, j, curr_max, curr_size, index, counter, flag;
       char *vertex_name, *temp;

       /*
    *Allocating of size 4 char*. Trying to make it a string pointer array
    *Not sure if this is the correct way
    */  
       vertex_name = malloc(4*sizeof(char*));
       /*
    *Setting the first two elements of the allocation to 
        *the second and third element of the command line argv 
    *as you may know, the first one is the file name
    */
       vertex_name[0] = argv[1];
       vertex_name[1] = argv[2];
       index=2;  //Index variable for the dynamic array
       curr_max = 3;   //current total number of elements, 1 < total allocated as array element count starts at 0
       curr_size = 4;  //Allocation amount int literal, count starts at 1

       /*
    *The outer loops starts at four as it is for the argv[] and the first one is irrelevent
    *The outer loop essentially jumps 3 elements at a time as 
    *I am ultimately going to use this for a graph data structure that 
    *I am trying to create. So this array will store all the unique names of vertices
    *so it makes setting the names when creating  vertices easy
    * Also will tell me how many unique vertices to create.
    *The inner loop only runs once and it checks if there is a name that alreaady exist.
    *It only takes into cosideration the first 2 out of the 3 that are considered in the outer loop
    *The the third one is going to be an integer value for the edge weight of two vertices 
    *so don't need it right now
    */
       for(i=4; i<argc; i+=3)
     {
       for(j=0; j<1; j++)
         {
               flag = 0;
           counter = 0;

           //Compare first argv[i] with all the elements
           //of vertex_name array
           while(counter<index)
         {
           if(strcmp(argv[i], vertex_name[counter]) == 0)
             {
               flag = 1;
               break;
             }
           counter++;
         }
           //If no match found, allocates some memory
           //adds the element to vertex_name
           //Increments index, curr_size, curr_max
           if(flag == 0)
             {
           temp = realloc(vertex_name, (curr_size + 1) * sizeof(char*)); //CHECK THE SYNTAX, WANNA ADD 2 MORE ELEMENTS TO ARRAY
           vertex_name = temp;
           vertex_name[index] = argv[i];
           index++;
           curr_size += 1;
           curr_max += 1;
         }

           flag = 0;   //reset flag
           counter = 0; //reset counter

           //Do the same comparison as above, but
           //this time its argv[i+1] compared
           while(counter < index)
         {
           if(strcmp(argv[i+1], vertex_name[j]) ==0)
             {
               flag = 1;
               break;
             }
           counter++;
         }
           //If no match found, same process as before
           //Increment index, curr_size, curr_max variables
         if(flag == 0)
           {
             temp = realloc(vertex_name, (curr_size + 1) * sizeof(char*)); //CHECK THE SYNTAX, WANNA ADD 2 MORE ELEMENTS TO ARRAY
             vertex_name = temp;
             vertex_name[index] = argv[i+1];
             index++;
             curr_size += 1;
             curr_max += 1;
           }

         }
     }
       //Returning the new array
       return vertex_name;
     }
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, Eitan T, sloth, Philip Rieck, Mark Sep 23 '12 at 14:47

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2 Answers 2

I don't know if you figure that you are treating vertex_name like is a collection of multiple names, instead of one single name.So you shall declare it as a char*.
And the return value shall be char
*, but now I don't know if you want to return a single name or multiple ones.
However this is the corrected code, see if it does the job:

char** unique_name(char *argv[], int argc)
{
    int i, j, curr_max, curr_size, index, counter, flag;
    char **vertex_name, *temp;

/*
 *Allocating of size 4 char*. Trying to make it a string pointer array
 *Not sure if this is the correct way
 */
    vertex_name = malloc(4*sizeof(char*));
    /*
     *Setting the first two elements of the allocation to
     *the second and third element of the command line argv
     *as you may know, the first one is the file name
     */
    vertex_name[0] = argv[1];
    vertex_name[1] = argv[2];
    index=2;  //Index variable for the dynamic array
    curr_max = 3;   //current total number of elements, 1 < total allocated as array element count starts at 0
    curr_size = 4;  //Allocation amount int literal, count starts at 1

    /*
     *The outer loops starts at four as it is for the argv[] and the first one is irrelevent
     *The outer loop essentially jumps 3 elements at a time as
     *I am ultimately going to use this for a graph data structure that
     *I am trying to create. So this array will store all the unique names of vertices
     *so it makes setting the names when creating  vertices easy
     * Also will tell me how many unique vertices to create.
     *The inner loop only runs once and it checks if there is a name that alreaady exist.
     *It only takes into cosideration the first 2 out of the 3 that are considered in the outer loop
     *The the third one is going to be an integer value for the edge weight of two vertices
     *so don't need it right now
     */
    for(i=4; i<argc; i+=3)
    {
        for(j=0; j<1; j++)
        {
            flag = 0;
            counter = 0;

            //Compare first argv[i] with all the elements
            //of vertex_name array
            while(counter<index)
            {
                if(strcmp(argv[i], vertex_name[counter]) == 0)
                {
                    flag = 1;
                    break;
                }
                counter++;
            }
            //If no match found, allocates some memory
            //adds the element to vertex_name
            //Increments index, curr_size, curr_max
            if(flag == 0)
            {
                temp = realloc(vertex_name, (curr_size + 1) * sizeof(char*)); //CHECK THE SYNTAX, WANNA ADD 2 MORE ELEMENTS TO ARRAY
                vertex_name = &temp;
                vertex_name[index] = argv[i];
                index++;
                curr_size += 1;
                curr_max += 1;
            }

            flag = 0;   //reset flag
            counter = 0; //reset counter

            //Do the same comparison as above, but
            //this time its argv[i+1] compared
            while(counter < index)
            {
                if(strcmp(argv[i+1], vertex_name[j]) ==0)
                {
                    flag = 1;
                    break;
                }
                counter++;
            }
            //If no match found, same process as before
            //Increment index, curr_size, curr_max variables
            if(flag == 0)
            {
                temp = realloc(vertex_name, (curr_size + 1) * sizeof(char*)); //CHECK THE SYNTAX, WANNA ADD 2 MORE ELEMENTS TO ARRAY
                vertex_name = &temp;
                vertex_name[index] = argv[i+1];
                index++;
                curr_size += 1;
                curr_max += 1;
            }

        }
    }
    //Returning the new array
    return vertex_name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, your only changes were reformatting and changing vertex_name to a char **? –  1'' Sep 23 '12 at 1:04
    
Thnx for you help but the &temp should be just temp otherwise I get segmentation fault. –  lucky88shp Sep 23 '12 at 2:14

You want vertex_name to be an array of strings/char *s, so vertex_name should be a char **. A line like vertex_name[0] = argv[1];, which assigns a char* to a char, shouldn't even compile?!

As a side note, it's cleaner to use variable++ instead of variable += 1 for everything, and this form has the added benefit that you can combine it into any expression that uses that variable. For example, you can write temp = realloc(vertex_name, (++curr_size) * sizeof(char*));. The ++ before the variable means that you increment (add 1 to) the variable before using it in the larger expression.

share|improve this answer
    
So I made the change of type char** from char*, but my output is still weird and the fault might be my own. Can you please show me what kind of format specifier I should use for the printf statement? Another question, can you explain me how char* equals to a string...is it because as C language has no way of declaring strings, so char* is basically a char pointer but how does the compiler know it is not just pointing to one char and instead to a whole string? –  lucky88shp Sep 23 '12 at 1:42
    
My printf looks like this: printf("=> %s \n", x), where variable x is a char** and has the returned value of the function. I get a warning message from compiler saying "%s was expecting char* but argument 2 is char**" –  lucky88shp Sep 23 '12 at 1:50
    
Use %s for a string (char ) and %c for a char. You're right that "char equals to a string... because as C language has no way of declaring strings, so char* is basically a char pointer". The thing is, the compiler doesn't know how many chars will be in a string, otherwise it would stop problems with bad allocation from happening at compile-time. At runtime, the number of bytes allocated to each pointer is stored in some "memory allocation table" which you can think of as a "master" data structure controlled by the OS. –  1'' Sep 23 '12 at 1:52
    
Oh, okay, based on your edit it's obvious that you're trying to print a pointer to a string instead of a string. You want to print x[some element] with the specifier %s, which will be a string. –  1'' Sep 23 '12 at 1:52
    
Yeah I just figured that out...cool finally something is working in my effort of almost 7 hrs! :D Btw, what do you think of my this approach for the bigger problem at hand, creating the graph data structure? And hey, thanks alot, you really are a god send! –  lucky88shp Sep 23 '12 at 1:56

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