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I have a couple structure definitions in my input code. For example:

struct node {
   int val;
   struct node *next;
};

or

typedef struct {
   int numer;
   int denom;
} Rational;

I used the following line to convert them into one line and copy it twice.

sed '/struct[^(){]*{/{:l N;s/\n//;/}[^}]*;/!t l;s/  */ /g;p;p}'

the result is this:

struct node { int val; struct node *next;};
struct node { int val; struct node *next;};
struct node { int val; struct node *next;};

typedef struct { int numer; int denom;} Rational;
typedef struct { int numer; int denom;} Rational;
typedef struct { int numer; int denom;} Rational;

This is what I want:

  1. I would like the first line to be restored to the original structure block
  2. I would like the second line to turn into to a function heading that looks like this...

    void init_structName( structName *var, int data1, int data2 ) 
    

-structName is basically the name of the structure.

-var is any name you like.

-data1, data2.... are values that are in the struct.

3.I would like the third line to turn into to the function body. Where I initialize the the data parameters. It would look like this.

    {
        var->data1 = data1;
        var->data2 = data2;
    }

Keep in mind that ALL my struct definitions in the input file are placed in one line and copied three times. So when the code finds a structure defintion it can assume that there will be two more copies below.

For example, this is the output I want if the input file had the repeating lines shown above.

struct node {
   int val;
   struct node *next;
};
void init_node(struct node *var, int val, struct node *next)
{
var->val = val;
var->next =  next;
}

typedef struct {
   int numer;
   int denom;
} Rational;
void init_Rational( Rational *var, int numer, int denom ) 
{
   var->numer = numer;
   var->denom = denom;
}

In case someone was curious. These functions will be called from the main function to initialize the struct variables.

Can someone help? I realize this is kind of tough. Thanks so much!!

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  nneonneo Sep 23 '12 at 2:05
    
    
hmm... I went through the question... I went through the question cited in the comment just above my comment... is it a homework? :) –  Serge Sep 23 '12 at 2:11
    
As an aside, keep in mind that C does give you limited initialization. struct node n = { 3, NULL }; is fine. –  Jo So Sep 23 '12 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

Seeing that sed is Turing Complete, it is possible to do it in a single go, but that doesn't mean that the code is very user friendly =)

My attempt at a solution would be:

#!/bin/sed -nf

/struct/b continue
p
d

: continue

# 1st step:
s/\(struct\s.*{\)\([^}]*\)\(}.*\)/\1\
\2\
\3/
s/;\(\s*[^\n}]\)/;\
\1/g
p

s/.*//
n
# 2nd step:
s/struct\s*\([A-Za-z_][A-Za-z_0-9]*\)\s*{\([^}]*\)}.*/void init_\1(struct \1 *var, \2)/
s/typedef\s*struct\s*{\([^}]*\)}\s*\([A-Za-z_][A-Za-z_0-9]*\)\s*;/void init_\2(struct \2 *var, \1)/
s/;/,/g
s/,\s*)/)/
p

s/.*//
n
# 3rd step
s/.*{\s*\([^}]*\)}.*/{\
\1}/
s/[A-Za-z \t]*[\* \t]\s*\([A-Za-z_][A-Za-z_0-9]*\)\s*;/\tvar->\1 = \1;\
/g
p

I'll try to explain everything I did, but firstly I must warn that this probably isn't very generalized. For example, it assumes that the three identical lines follow each other (ie. no other line between them).

Before starting, notice that the file is a script that requires the "-n" flag to run. This tells sed to not print anything to standard output unless the script explicitly tells it to (through the "p" command, for example). The "-f" options is a "trick" to tell sed to open the file that follows. When executing the script with "./myscript.sed", bash will execute "/bin/sed -nf myscript.sed", so it will correctly read the rest of the script.

Step zero would be just a check to see if we have a valid line. I'm assuming every valid line contains the word struct. If the line is valid, the script branches (jumps, the "b" command is equivalent to the goto statement in C) to the continue label (differently from C, labels start with ":", rather than ending with it). If it isn't valid, we force it to be printed with the "p" command, and then delete the line from pattern space with the "d" command. By deleting the line, sed will read the next line and start executing the script from the beginning.

If the line is valid, the actions to change the lines start. The first step is to generate the struct body. This is done by a series of commands.

  1. Separate the line into three parts, everything up to the opening bracket, everything up to the closing bracket (but without including it), and everything from the closing bracket (now including it). I should mention that one of the quirks of sed is that we search for newlines with "\n", but write newlines with a "\" followed by an actual newline. That's why this command is split into three different lines. IIRC this behaviour is specific to POSIX sed, but probably the GNU version (present in most Linux distributions) allows writing a newline with "\n".
  2. Add a newline after every semicolon. The this works is a bit awkward, we copy everything after the semicolon after a newline inserted after the semicolon. The g flag tells sed to do this repeatedly, and that is why it works. Also note again the newline escaping.
  3. Force the result to be printed

Before the second step, we manually clear the lines from the pattern-space (ie. buffer), so we can start fresh for the next line. If we did this with the "d" command, sed would start reading the commands from the start of the file again. The "n" command then reads the next line into the pattern-space. After that, we start the commands to transform the line into a function declaration:

  1. We first match the word struct, followed by zero or more white space, then followed by a C identifier that can start with underscore or alphabetic letters, and can contain underscores and alphanumeric characters. The identifier is captured into the "variable" "\1". We then match the content between brackets, which is stored into "\2". These are then used to generate the function declaration.
  2. We then do the same process, but now for the "typedef" case. Notice that now the identifier is after the brackets, so "\1" now contains the contents inside the brackets and "\2" contains the identifier.
  3. Now we replace all semicolons with commas, so it can start looking more like a function definition.
  4. The last substitute command removes the extra comma before the closing parenthesis.
  5. Finally print the result.

Again, before the last step, manually clean the pattern-space and read the next line. The step will then generate the function body:

  1. Match and capture everything inside the brackets. Notice the ".*" before the opening bracket and after the closing bracket. This is used so only the contents of the brackets are written afterwards. When writing the output, we place the opening the bracket in a separate line.
  2. We match alphabetic characters and spaces, so we can skip the type declaration. We require at least a white space character or an asterisk (for pointers) to mark the start of the identifier. We then proceed to capture the identifier. This only works because of what follows the capture: we explicitly require that after the identifier there are only optional white spaces followed by a semicolon. This forces the expression to get the identifier characters before the semicolon, ie. if there are more than two words, it will only get the last word. Therefore it would work with "unsigned int var", capturing "var" correctly. When writing the output, we place some indentation, followed by the desired format, including the escaped newline.
  3. Print the final output.

I don't know if I was clear enough. Feel free to ask for any clarifications.

Hope this helps =)

share|improve this answer
    
I tip my hat to you. Very impressive. –  gvalkov Sep 25 '12 at 9:45

This should give you a few tips on how inappropriate sed actually is for this sort of task. I couldn't figure out how to do it in one pass and by the time I finished writing the scripts, I noticed you were expecting somewhat different results.

Your problem is better suited for a scripting language and a parsing library. Consider python + pyparsing (here is an example C struct parsing grammar, but you would need something much simpler than that) or perl6's rules.

Still, perhaps this will be of some use if you decide to stick to sed:

pass-one.sh

#!/bin/sed -nf

/^struct/ {
  s|^\(struct[^(){]*{\)|\1\n|
  s|[^}];|;\n|gp
  a \\n
}

/^typedef/ {
  h
  # create signature
  s|.*{\(.*\)} \(.*\);|void init_\2( \2 *var, \1 ) {|
  # insert argument list to signature and remove trailing ;
  s|\([^;]*\); ) {|\1 ) {|g
  s|;|,|g
  p

  g
  # add constructor (further substitutions follow in pass-two)
  s|.*{\(.*\)}.*|\1|
  s|;|;\n|g
  s|\n$||p

  a }
  a \\n
}

pass-two.sh

#!/bin/sed -f

# fix struct indent
/^struct/ {
  :loop1
  n
  s|^ |    |
  t loop1
}

# unsigned int name -> var->name = name
/^void init_/{
  :loop2
  n
  s|.* \(.*\);|    var->\1 = \1;|
  t loop2
}

Usage

$ cat << EOF | ./pass-one.sh | ./pass-two.sh
struct node { int val; struct node *next;};
typedef struct { int numer; int denom;} Rational;

struct node { int val; struct node *next;};
typedef struct { int numer; unsigned int denom;} Rational;
EOF
struct node {
    int va;
    struct node *nex;
};


void init_Rational( Rational *var,  int numer, int denom ) {
    var->numer = numer;
    var->denom = denom;
}


struct node {
    int va;
    struct node *nex;
};


void init_Rational( Rational *var,  int numer, unsigned int denom ) {
    var->numer = numer;
    var->denom = denom;
}
share|improve this answer

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