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I'm doing this:

var hpl = doc.getElementById("hpl");

and then this:

hpl.style.height = 28 + "px";

My question: am I accessing the DOM twice, once to reference the element, and then a second time to set the style height?

If so, then am I right in concluding that this is inefficient with respect to DOM calls, even though it minimises nicely.

var hpl = document.getElementById("hpl");
if (test === "Abel") {
    hpl.style.height = 28 + "px";
} else {
    hpl.style.height = 42 + "px";
}

So this would be better in terms of speed:

if (test === "Abel") {
    document.getElementById("hpl").style.height = 28 + "px";
} else {
    document.getElementById("hpl").style.height = 42 + "px";
}

I've got a jsperf here which suggests there is no real difference, although I'd like to understand the theory behind this. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The computers now-days can execute the document.getElementById function millions of times per second. Don't waste your time on it. And anyway the DOM element is cached after the call. –  gdoron Sep 23 '12 at 5:18
    
More important than any perf-difference between saving the getElementById in a local variable and repeating it is that saving to a local is cleaner, less-cluttered code. Use a local variable here -- not because it's faster (although it is, if very very marginally, and independent of any getElementById optimizations browsers might or might not implement), but because it reads better. (It's also less error-prone -- you're not typing "hpl" twice with greater potential for typos, not to mention the rest of the repeated characters.) –  Jeff Walden Sep 23 '12 at 5:33
    
Thank you, everyone. –  Nick Sep 23 '12 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The two different ways you're doing it are no different from the standpoint of accessing the DOM.

var hpl = doc.getElementById("hpl");
hpl.style.height = 28 + "px";

This finds the DOM element that has the id="hpl", puts it into a local variable and then uses the local variable to directly reference the DOM element (no searching required) to modify it.


When you do it this way:

document.getElementById("hpl").style.height = 28 + "px";

the only difference is that you don't store it in a local variable (though it is stored internally in the javascript engine). It still gets the DOM element by finding the DOM element that has id="hpl" and then uses that reference to the DOM element to directly set the style value. No significant difference between this and the first way.

A stored reference to a DOM element is a very efficient way to access a DOM element. No searching is required. Internally in the browser/javascript engine, the DOM reference is a data structure that contains a fast way to get to the actual DOM object (probably a pointer to it, but the actual implementation is up to the browser).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks once again for the help. Incidentally, in something like a singleton, is it regarded as good or poor form to store a reference as a property/private variable to be accessed by multiple methods or private functions? –  Nick Sep 23 '12 at 9:57
    
@Nick - whether to store a DOM reference in a private variable is a bit of a tradeoff. If you access it frequently, then storing it can improve performance. But, if your page is dynamic at all (removing and creating DOM elements), then storing a reference can lead to a memory leak or wrong reference if it isn't updated after the DOM element is changed. There is no right or wrong, it depends upon the circumstances. –  jfriend00 Sep 23 '12 at 14:59
    
Cheers. Think I'm safe, but meaning to nut up on memory leaks for a while now. –  Nick Sep 24 '12 at 4:45

As far as I know, once you've accessed the DOM element by Id once, it's put into a dictionary for quick reference later (like a hashtable/hasmap).

share|improve this answer
1  
That's a quality-of-implementation decision. There is no requirement in any spec that getElementById have any particular performance characteristics, so it's best to only perform it once. (Browsers will generally have internal optimizations for cases like this, but you shouldn't go around unnecessarily depending on them.) –  Jeff Walden Sep 23 '12 at 5:31

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