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I am creating a new board obtained by exchanging two adjacent blocks in the same row on an original board. The problem is that the new board overrides the content of the original board.

For example:

 int[][] origBoard = { { 0, 4, 6 }, {  5, 3, 1 }, { 2, 8, 7 } };
 int[][] twinBoard = { { 0, 6, 4 }, { 5, 3, 1 }, { 2, 8, 7 } };

What happens is that the origBoard becomes the same as the twinBoard when I assert the following:

 Board B = new Board(origBoard);
 Board b = B.twin();
 assertFalse("Calling twin() modifies the original Board.", B.equals(b));

My code is as follows:

public class Board {

    private int[][] goalBoard;

    private final Node node;

    private class Node {
        private int[][] board;
        private int move;
        private Node next;
    }

    // construct a board from an N-by-N array of blocks
    // (where blocks[i][j] = block in row i, column j)
    public Board(int[][] blocks) {
        int N = blocks.length;

        goalBoard = new int[N][N];
        for (int i = 0; i < dimension(); i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < dimension(); j++) {
                if (i == N - 1 && j == N - 1) {
                    goalBoard[i][j] = 0;
                } else {
                    goalBoard[i][j] = N * i + (j + 1);
                }
            }
        }

        // initial node
        node = new Node();
        node.board = blocks;
        node.move = 0;
        node.next = null;
    }

    // board dimension N
    public int dimension() {
        return goalBoard.length;
    }

    // a board obtained by exchanging two adjacent blocks in the same row
    public Board twin() {
        int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()];
        testBoardATwin = node.board;
        int x = node.board[0][0];
        int y = node.board[0][1];

        // DEFAULT
        if (x != 0 && y != 0) {
            testBoardATwin[0][0] = y;
            testBoardATwin[0][1] = x;
        }
        // 2x2
        if (dimension() == 2 || y == 0) {
            if (x == 0 || y == 0) {
                x = node.board[1][0];
                y = node.board[1][1];
                testBoardATwin[1][1] = x;
                testBoardATwin[1][0] = y;
            }
        } else {
            if (x == 0) {
                testBoardATwin[0][1] = node.board[0][2];
                testBoardATwin[0][2] = y;
            }
        }

        Board board = new Board(testBoardATwin);
        return board;
    }

    // does this board equal y?
    public boolean equals(Object y) {
        Board testBoard = (Board) y;
        if (testBoard == null) {
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < dimension(); i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < dimension(); j++) {
                if (testBoard.node.board[i][j] != node.board[i][j]) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

}

What am i doing wrong? Please help. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Why not just do a straight-forward copy of the original board's contents to the new board? –  Dai Sep 23 '12 at 5:30
    
Also, in Java the convention is to implement the Clonable interface and have the method called clone instead of twin. –  Dai Sep 23 '12 at 5:31
    
Where do you need object immutability in this scenario? –  Lion Sep 23 '12 at 5:32
    
no... the twin method does not copy the board itself –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:35
    
the problem is when i do the twin method, the original board is being overwritten and becomes equal to the twin board(w/c has different content) –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:36
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

node = new Node(); node.board = blocks;

And same tricky place here in Board constructor. You not copying your input array but assigning a reference to a class member property.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean? –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:56
    
You've passed blocks[][] array into a constructor, so if you'll modify its value later outside of constructor it will be modified in a returned Board too (because of not copying it's value but assigning same reference). This can be a desired behaviour and can be not. –  Igor Lukyanenkov Sep 23 '12 at 6:02
    
how can i fix this? –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 6:07
    
node = new Node(); node.board = new int[blocks.length][]; for (int i=0; i<blocks.length; i++) node.board[i] = Arrays.copyof(blocks[i], blocks[i].length) –  Igor Lukyanenkov Sep 23 '12 at 6:49
    
thank you very much :) –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 6:57
show 1 more comment
int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()];
testBoardATwin = node.board;

This is where your problem is. If you want to make a new one, don't follow that up by immediately changing it to the old one.

But the comments are right, too. A straightforward copy and modification would make more sense.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by a straightforward copy and modification? –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:37
    
You could use Arrays.copyOf like Tim suggested to get a copy of the board array, then make changes to it. Right now you're not copying it, you're referencing the original board itself. –  Geobits Sep 23 '12 at 5:41
    
Hi! I've tried your suggestion: int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()]; testBoardATwin = Arrays.copyOf(node.board, dimension()); But the problem is still the same. – –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:52
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This is the problem:

int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()];
testBoardATwin = node.board;

Everything starts off well when the code makes a new int[][] array, but then it immediately discards that new array and just uses the one belonging to the instance twin is called on.

Instead, what needs to happen is for node.board to be index by index, or by using something like Arrays.copyOf.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi! I've tried your suggestion: int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()]; testBoardATwin = Arrays.copyOf(node.board, dimension()); But the problem is still the same. –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:41
    
Hi! I've tried your suggestion: int[][] testBoardATwin = new int[dimension()][dimension()]; testBoardATwin = Arrays.copyOf(node.board, dimension()); But the problem is still the same. – –  newbie Sep 23 '12 at 5:51
add comment

To make an object you have to follow these instructions:

  • First of all you have to make the class final
  • Make all fields final and private.
  • Don't provide "setter" methods
  • Don't allow subclasses to override methods.
  • Notice that no Methods that modify state

And One of the best reference you can refer that http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/imstrat.html

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to mention the need to do deep copies for your accessor methods that return objects (not primitives). –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 23 '12 at 5:44
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In order to deep copy the multi-dimensional array, I did this:

  private static int[][] copy2d(int[][] nums) {
            int[][] copy = new int[nums.length][];

            for (int i = 0; i < copy.length; i++) {
                    int[] member = new int[nums[i].length];
                    System.arraycopy(nums[i], 0, member, 0, nums[i].length);
                    copy[i] = member;
            }

            return copy;
        }

    int[][] testBoardATwin = copy2d(node.board);
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