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Maybe it's just late, but I cannot figure out why this isn't working. When I have a post_save signal call a generic function, it works, but when I have a post_save signal call a method from a model, nothing happens. Here is code that works:

class Revision(models.Model):
    # Model junk...

def send_email(sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
    if created:
        print "DO STUFF"

signals.post_save.connect(send_email, sender=Revision)

But this does not work:

class Revision(models.Model):
    # Model junk...

    def send_email(sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
        if created:
            print "DO STUFF"

signals.post_save.connect(Revision.send_email, sender=Revision)

Is there a kind soul out there who will keep me from smashing my head into the wall? Thanks.

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Maybe helpful? Django pre_save signal does not work – ire_and_curses Sep 23 '12 at 6:16
1  
The best practice is to put all your signals in a signals.py; don't intermingle them with the django model class. – Burhan Khalid Sep 23 '12 at 8:47
up vote 21 down vote accepted

It seems to me that the problem in the second one is you are using an unbounded method send_mail. If you really want to call send_mail from within a class, maybe @classmethod or @staticmethod will help you out:

class Revision(models.Model):
    # Model junk...

    @classmethod
    def send_email(cls, sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
        if created:
            print "DO STUFF"

signals.post_save.connect(Revision.send_email, sender=Revision)

or

class Revision(models.Model):
    # Model junk...

    @staticmethod
    def send_email(sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
        if created:
            print "DO STUFF"

signals.post_save.connect(Revision.send_email, sender=Revision)

Alternatively without using these decorators, you can pass the bounded instance method:

class Revision(models.Model):
# Model junk...

    def send_email(self, sender, instance, created, **kwargs):
        if created:
            print "DO STUFF"

signals.post_save.connect(Revision().send_email, sender=Revision)

References:

  1. From the Django source code:

    def connect(self, receiver, sender=None, weak=True, dispatch_uid=None):
        """
        Connect receiver to sender for signal.
    
        Arguments:
    
            receiver
                A function or an instance method which is to receive signals.
                Receivers must be hashable objects.
    
                If weak is True, then receiver must be weak-referencable (more
                precisely saferef.safeRef() must be able to create a reference
                to the receiver).
    
                Receivers must be able to accept keyword arguments.
    
                If receivers have a dispatch_uid attribute, the receiver will
                not be added if another receiver already exists with that
                dispatch_uid.
    
  2. Difference between @classmethod and @staticmethod: What is the difference between @staticmethod and @classmethod in Python?

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