Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
class Person {
   // Data members of person
public:
    Person(int x)  { cout << "Person::Person(int ) called" << endl;   }
};

class Faculty : public Person {
   // data members of Faculty
public:
    Faculty(int x):Person(x)   {
       cout<<"Faculty::Faculty(int ) called"<< endl;
    }
};

class Student : public Person {
   // data members of Student
public:
    Student(int x):Person(x) {
        cout<<"Student::Student(int ) called"<< endl;
    }
};

class TA : public Faculty, public Student  {
public:
    TA(int x):Student(x), Faculty(x)   {
        cout<<"TA::TA(int ) called"<< endl;
    }
};

int main()  {
    TA ta1(30);
}

O/p:

Person::Person() called
Faculty::Faculty(int ) called
Student::Student(int ) called
TA::TA(int ) called

In the above diamond shape, two parents classes are inherited from grand parent with virtual keyword, Hence the constructor of Person class is called only once. But Why grand parent's default constructor called here. Can anyone tell me the exact reason Thanks alot

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Sep 24 '12 at 13:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Where is the virtual inheritance? –  juanchopanza Sep 23 '12 at 6:26
2  
Because more and more people ask for solutions; not help, would be my guess. –  WhozCraig Sep 23 '12 at 6:29
1  
In addition to the already mentioned missing virtual keyword, the output cannot possibly contain "Person::Person() called", as your code doesn't include any code that might potentially print that string. Make sure the code actually matches your question. –  hvd Sep 23 '12 at 7:02

3 Answers 3

TA is a Person, so there is nothing unexpected about Person's constructor being called. If you used virtual inheritance like you claimed, your TA class would have a single Person sub-object, so the fact that it's constructor is called once is to be expected. If you had not used virtual inheritance, TA would have two Person sub-objects, and you could expect two Person constructor calls.

share|improve this answer

Diamond configurations require virtual base classes or your going to get duplicity in object representation.

class A
{
}

class B : virtual public A
{
};

class C : virtual public A
{
}

class D: public B, public C
{
}

This will ensure only a single representation of A makes it into the final object of type D, and it will be shared by all.

I leave it as an exercise to the questioner how to pass constructor parameters through this. It is not intuitive, but google + "virtual base class" will be more than enlightening.

share|improve this answer
    
OP claims to be doing this, and seems surprised that A's constructor is called at all. –  juanchopanza Sep 23 '12 at 6:37
    
Yeah, I know guys that say they saw Elvis in a K-mart in Oklahoma, but that doesn't mean they did. The evidence that he is NOT declaring them virtual is in the very code he posted, so what more can you do? –  WhozCraig Sep 23 '12 at 6:38
    
I know, it involves some guesswork. The A constructor is allegedly called only once, which is compatible with virtual inheritance. –  juanchopanza Sep 23 '12 at 6:40

C++ Faq answers your question nicely:

[25.12] What special considerations do I need to know about when I inherit from a class that uses virtual inheritance?

Initialization list of most-derived-class's ctor directly invokes the virtual base class's ctor.

Because a virtual base class subobject occurs only once in an instance, there are special rules to make sure the virtual base class's constructor and destructor get called exactly once per instance. The C++ rules say that virtual base classes are constructed before all non-virtual base classes. The thing you as a programmer need to know is this: constructors for virtual base classes anywhere in your class's inheritance hierarchy are called by the "most derived" class's constructor.

Practically speaking, this means that when you create a concrete class that has a virtual base class, you must be prepared to pass whatever parameters are required to call the virtual base class's constructor. And, of course, if there are several virtual base classes anywhere in your classes ancestry, you must be prepared to call all their constructors. This might mean that the most-derived class's constructor needs more parameters than you might otherwise think.

However, if the author of the virtual base class followed the guideline in the previous FAQ, then the virtual base class's constructor probably takes no parameters since it doesn't have any data to initialize. This means (fortunately!) the authors of the concrete classes that inherit eventually from the virtual base class do not need to worry about taking extra parameters to pass to the virtual base class's ctor.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.