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I have a table which consists of 64 different fields. i am going to search with a single keyword in it, Results should match the keyword from any field. Give some suggestions.

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4  
don't forget to click the tick and upvote answers that helped you. – NullPoiиteя Sep 23 '12 at 8:28
    
^I completely agree and have similar thoughts :) – instanceOfObject Sep 23 '12 at 9:01
    
select * from *where *like %search_text%. Is this possible ??? – R J. Sep 23 '12 at 9:13
1  
The fact that you need to do this kind of query suggests a problem with your schema. If all the fields contain the same kind of data, they should probably be rows of a table, not columns. – Barmar Sep 24 '12 at 2:50
    
@Barmar I import wild CSV files into staging tables in my system and sometimes need to search more than field in the staging table to determine a fact that will belong to a single field in my core data table(s). – Buttle Butkus Oct 22 '15 at 18:46

you can use the where with multiple condition with OR

like

where
name = 'expected'
OR rate ='expected' 
OR country ='expected'
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if i use OR , have to use all the 64 fields . is there any other solution for this ..? – R J. Sep 23 '12 at 9:04
    
Did you check my solutions in the same post? – instanceOfObject Sep 23 '12 at 13:25
    
@instanceOfObject what!!!! what do you want to say?? – NullPoiиteя Sep 23 '12 at 15:06
    
@RegisteredUser For alternate solutions/suggestions (If he has concerns with multiple ORs). – instanceOfObject Sep 23 '12 at 18:09
SELECT * FROM `some_table`
WHERE
CONCAT_WS('|',`column1`,`column2`,`column3`,`column4`,`column64`) # single condition, many columns
LIKE '%VT%'

Voila.

The '|' separator, by the way, is to prevent you finding coincidental matches where, e.g., column1 ends in 'V' and column2 starts with 'T', which would give you a false positive in a search for "VT".

I'm not sure if the above method is faster than the OR method (I would guess they're the same speed) , but it definitely involves less typing if you're writing the query by hand.

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Another possibility would be to use FOR XML to get all columns to print to a single field... like this:

SELECT c.*
FROM (
SELECT a.*
,( SELECT *
   FROM table_to_search b
   WHERE a.KeyField = b.KeyField
   FOR XML RAW) AS `Full_Text_Record`
FROM table_to_search a) c
WHERE c.`Full_Text_Record` LIKE '%Search_string%'

Might take a while to run if it is a particularly large table, but it should brute force you to find out if that string exists in any given table.

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What are the square brackets for? This is MySQL, not SQL-Server. – Barmar Oct 22 '15 at 19:34
    
Thanks Barmar... good catch :-) – processoriented Oct 30 '15 at 13:42

I can't see a way around your query being simple but long:

SET @term = "Somesearch";
SELECT id, title FROM sometable WHERE
    col1 LIKE '%@term%' OR
    col2 LIKE '%@term%' OR
    col3 LIKE '%@term%' ...;

Instead of using a MySQL variable, you can just use a language-specific variable but for the sake of examples, I thought I'd stick with MySQL itself.

The "..." is where you'd place the other 61 columns/fields.

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If you can translate this SQL Server syntax to MySQL

WHERE
name = @keyword OR
country = @keyword OR
department = @keyword OR
@keyword IS NULL -- match all when search text is empty
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Simplest solution would be to use multiple ORs.

select * from TAB where col1 like "%VAR%" OR col2 like "%VAR%" OR......col64 like "%VAR%";

You can use like or = as per the requirement, but it will require to change your query every time you add a new column.

As an alternative, you can take SQLDump for that table and then search that file.

With some Googling,

  1. See if this project is useful - http://code.google.com/p/anywhereindb/. Searches all the fields and praised by many.

  2. Try to use the information from information_schema table. Look for all the columns in the table. Now, try to form your query using this information.

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You could write one query that will generate a query for every column in your table. In the example below the schema ("owner") is 'DEV_USER' The table with your 64 fields is called 'CUSTOMER_INFO' The criteria in the search is any column with a value of 'VT' in it:

select 'SELECT ' || COLUMN_NAME || ' FROM CUSTOMER_INFO
WHERE '  || COLUMN_NAME || q'# LIKE '%VT%';#'
FROM ALL_TAB_COLS 
WHERE OWNER = 'DEV_USER'
AND TABLE_NAME = 'CUSTOMER_INFO'; 

This one query will generate a query for each field for you. The results of running the above would be;

SELECT ADDRESS_1 FROM CUSTOMER_INFO
WHERE ADDRESS_1 LIKE '%VT%';

SELECT ADDRESS_2 FROM CUSTOMER_INFO
WHERE ADDRESS_2 LIKE '%VT%';

SELECT CITY FROM CUSTOMER_ADDRESSES_QASB
WHERE CITY LIKE '%VT%';

SELECT STATE_PROVINCE FROM CUSTOMER_INFO
WHERE STATE_PROVINCE LIKE '%VT%';

SELECT ZIP_POSTAL_CODE FROM CUSTOMER_INFO
WHERE ZIP_POSTAL_CODE LIKE '%VT%';
WHERE LATITUDE LIKE '%VT%';

... and so on for each column in the table

Then you just paste those queries that were generated from your first query into another tab and run them.

Hope that helps. :-)

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1  
Incredibly inefficient. – Buttle Butkus Jan 31 '14 at 5:54

You can use dynamic SQL to generate and execute a query that searches all the columns.

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE searchAllCols(inDB VARCHAR(64), inTable VARCHAR(64), search VARCHAR(32))
BEGIN
    SET @matches = (
        SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT('`', COLUMN_NAME, '` LIKE "%', search, '%"') SEPARATOR ' OR ')
        FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
        WHERE table_name = inTable and table_schema = inDB);
    PREPARE stmt FROM CONCAT('SELECT * FROM `', inDB, '`.`', inTable, '` WHERE ', @matches);
    EXECUTE stmt;
END
$$
CALL searchAllCols('table_to_search', 'searchString');
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