Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am really new to Java and I need a circle to move around a JFrame when it's clicked, but the circle has to get random coordinates. So far this code generates a new circle every time it's clicked, but all the other circles stay there as well. I only need one circle to move around the frame. So maybe someone can help me a little :)

Here is my code:

public class test2 extends JFrame implements MouseListener {
int height, width;
public test2() {
    this.setTitle("Click");
    this.setSize(400,400);
    this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    this.setVisible(true);
    addMouseListener(this);
    width = getSize().width;
    height = getSize().height;
}

public void paint (Graphics g) {
    setBackground (Color.red);
    g.setColor(Color.yellow);
    int a, b;
    a = -50 + (int)(Math.random()*(width+40));
    b = (int)(Math.random()*(height+20));
    g.fillOval(a, b, 130, 110);
}

    public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
    int a, b;
    a = -50 + (int)(Math.random()*(width+40));
    b = (int)(Math.random()*(height+20));
    repaint();
}

public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e){}
public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e){}
public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){}
public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){}

public static void main(String arg[]){

    new test2();
}

}
share|improve this question
1  
A word of advice, it's better to take advantage of double buffering provided by Swing. So instead of painting directly onto the JFrame, much wise would be to paint on a JPanel/JComponent by overridding the respective paintComponent(...) method. –  nIcE cOw Sep 23 '12 at 11:51
    
@Anony-Mousse: that tag is obsolete. –  trashgod Sep 23 '12 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

See if this helps, here i have filled the entire rect with background color before drawing the circle. Though not efficient but serves the purpose

replace the paint method as follows

public void paint (Graphics g) {
        setBackground (Color.red);
        g.setColor(Color.red);
        g.fillRect(0, 0, width, height);
        g.setColor(Color.yellow);
        int a, b;
        a = -50 + (int)(Math.random()*(width+40));
        b = (int)(Math.random()*(height+20));
        g.fillOval(a, b, 130, 110);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank a lot, it worked :) –  Myt Sep 23 '12 at 9:37

i think one of the major problems you are having here is that you don't make global a and b variables. You create 2 new variables every time you call the paint() and mouseClicked() methods. There are two other problems/warnings.

  1. Your `paint() method really should be called paintComponents(Graphics g) if you are using a JFrame
  2. You need to add the line super.paint(g); under your paintComponents() definition.

I am actually quite surprised that anything is drawn at all. Also, Anony-Mousse is right when he says about conventions. Class names should always begin with a capital.

Your code should look like this:

public class Test2 extends JFrame implements MouseListener {
int height, width;
int a,b;
public test2() {
    this.setTitle("Click");
    this.setSize(400,400);
    this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    this.setVisible(true);
    addMouseListener(this);
    width = getSize().width;
    height = getSize().height;
}

public void paintComponents(Graphics g) {
    super.paint(g);
    setBackground(Color.red);
    g.setColor(Color.yellow);
    a = -50 + (int)(Math.random()*(width+40));
    b = (int)(Math.random()*(height+20));
    g.fillOval(a, b, 130, 110);
}

    public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
    int a, b;
    a = -50 + (int)(Math.random()*(width+40));
    b = (int)(Math.random()*(height+20));
    repaint();
}

public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e){}
public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e){}
public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){}
public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){}

public static void main(String arg[]){

    new test2();
}

}
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 but I'd suggest that you (and the OP) use a JPanel or JComponent instead, for one, it provides double buffering, IMHO –  MadProgrammer Sep 23 '12 at 9:38
    
Your right, of course, but i was focusing on the actual graphics rather than the screens. –  imulsion Sep 23 '12 at 9:39
    
Sorry, just an observation, not a criticism ;) –  MadProgrammer Sep 23 '12 at 9:45
    
i know no worries :) i upvoted ur comment because it was something I didn't spot xD –  imulsion Sep 23 '12 at 9:46
    
Thanks for all the information, as I said I am new to Java and all the pointers are appreciated. –  Myt Sep 23 '12 at 9:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.