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In Java there is methods in either StringBuffer() or StringBuilder() called insert() and deleteCharAt() I am very interested in understanding a little more how these two specific methods work. Or how one would program one using the standard java String methods. I reckon they are pretty simple methods to write yourself?

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closed as not constructive by finnw, Vikdor, j0k, dystroy, kapep Sep 23 '12 at 13:10

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3  
Try looking at the source code of Respective classes. –  Santosh Sep 23 '12 at 11:29
3  
Google java grepcode stringbuilder. –  Keppil Sep 23 '12 at 11:30
    
Or you could look inside the JDK. –  Coupon22 Sep 23 '12 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the Sun's implementation both methods are delegated to StringBuffer's parent class AbstractStringBuilder:

public synchronized StringBuffer insert(int index, char str[], int offset,
                                        int len) 
{
    super.insert(index, str, offset, len);
    return this;
}

public synchronized StringBuffer deleteCharAt(int index) {
    super.deleteCharAt(index);
    return this;
}

AbstractStringBuffer has the following implementations:

public AbstractStringBuilder insert(int index, char str[], int offset,
                                    int len)
{
    if ((index < 0) || (index > length()))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(index);
    if ((offset < 0) || (len < 0) || (offset > str.length - len))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(
            "offset " + offset + ", len " + len + ", str.length " 
            + str.length);
    int newCount = count + len;
    if (newCount > value.length)
        expandCapacity(newCount);
    System.arraycopy(value, index, value, index + len, count - index);
    System.arraycopy(str, offset, value, index, len);
    count = newCount;
    return this;
}

public AbstractStringBuilder deleteCharAt(int index) {
    if ((index < 0) || (index >= count))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(index);
    System.arraycopy(value, index+1, value, index, count-index-1);
    count--;
    return this;
}

So, nothing special.

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According to the javadoc, both classes say the same thing about their methods. Insert inserts a string into a string based on the input. CharArray adds a string based on a CharArray and so on. DeleteCharAt removes a character at a certain part in the string.

StringBuffer is a little bit faster, but StringBuilder is newer. 2

The standard java String methods don't contain deleteCharAt() or insert() (that's why there is StringBuilder/Buffer), but you can probably find a way to work around it by substring().

Yes, you could write the methods yourself. I would look at the source for StringBuilder or StringBuilder in JDK.

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The insert(…) methods of both StringBuilder and StringBuffer use simple array copying implemented in AbstractStringBuilder.insert(int, String):

public AbstractStringBuilder insert(int offset, String str) {
    if ((offset < 0) || (offset > length()))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(offset);
    if (str == null)
        str = "null";
    int len = str.length();
    ensureCapacityInternal(count + len);
    System.arraycopy(value, offset, value, offset + len, count - offset);
    str.getChars(value, offset);
    count += len;
    return this;
}

First it ensures that the internal char [] array is large enough to store the result then moves the characters after the insertion point to the right using System.arraycopy(…) and overwrites characters starting at the insertion point with the given string.

Similarly, the deleteCharAt(int) methods of both StringBuilder and StringBuffer call AbstractStringBuilder.deleteCharAt(int):

public AbstractStringBuilder deleteCharAt(int index) {
    if ((index < 0) || (index >= count))
        throw new StringIndexOutOfBoundsException(index);
    System.arraycopy(value, index+1, value, index, count-index-1);
    count--;
    return this;
}

Deleting a character is done by using System.arraycopy(…) the other way around: this time the characters after the deletion point are shifted by one character to the left.

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