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I have a MySQL table called "objecttable" that has the following structure and data in it. (The data is just a sequence, there is a whole lot more).

ID    |  Name              |  posX  |  posY   | posZ |rotX | rotY | rotZ | rotW  |  
3562  |   LODpmedhos1_LAe  |  2062  |  -1703  |  16  |  0  |  45  |  22  |  1    |  
3559  |   LODpmedhos5_LAe  |  2021  |  -1717  |  15  |  0  |  45  |  34  |  1    |  
3561  |   LODpmedhos3_LAe  |  2021  |  -1717  |  15  |  0  |  45  |  34  |  1    |  

I want to figure out which records have the same posX, posY, posZ, rotX, rotY and rotZ values and insert them into a table called "matchtable", and in the end I want it to look like this (I have the table structure ready)

ID1     |       Name            |   ID2     |   Name          |  
3559    |   LODpmedhos5_LAe     |   3561    |  LODpmedhos3_LAe|  

I'd appreciate if someone could give me the correct SQL query for it. I don't have more than two matching coordinates and not all coordinates match.

Sorry if the table representations suck, I'll try to make a HTML table if necessary.

Thanks!

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What have you tried so far? –  LolCoder 아카 쉬 Sep 23 '12 at 12:15
    
All the SQL queries I tried were those I found here on StackExchange and none worked, I'm afraid it's like I didn't try anything. No idea which way to go about it. –  Funstein Sep 23 '12 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

This query will do the trick, but the number of results might be a LOT more than required. For example, if there are 5 rows satisfying your query, then the results will be 20( = n*(n-1) ) in number.

SELECT ot.ID AS ID1, ot.Name AS Name1, ot2.ID AS ID2, ot2.Name AS Name
FROM objecttable ot
JOIN objecttable ot2
    ON ot.ID > ot2.ID
        AND ot.posX = ot2.posX
        AND ot.posY = ot2.posY
        AND ot.posZ = ot2.posZ
        AND ot.rotX = ot2.rotX
        AND ot.rotY = ot2.rotY
        AND ot.rotZ = ot2.rotZ

EDIT

In reply to lserni's comment:

ON ot.ID <> ot2.ID

The above condition is there to remove the result like:

ID1     |       Name            |   ID2     |   Name          |
3559    |   LODpmedhos5_LAe     |   3559    |  LODpmedhos5_LAe|
share|improve this answer
    
Seems like it works, but I don't get what this is supposed to mean: For example, if there are 5 rows satisfying your query, then the results will be 20( = n*(n-1) ) in number. –  Funstein Sep 23 '12 at 12:27
    
@Funstein Let's suppose there was a third row too, which had same conditions as with your ID = 3559, then total number of rows generated would be 6 following the Permutation of 3P2. –  hjpotter92 Sep 23 '12 at 12:34
    
Er, shouldn't the match be on equal coordinates? That query there looks like it searches for objects that do not match... –  lserni Sep 23 '12 at 12:37
    
@lserni Check the edit. –  hjpotter92 Sep 23 '12 at 12:42
    
Yes, but I was referring to the other conditions. ot.posX <> ot2.posX will return those records where coordinates differ, and the OP wanted those records where coordinates match (and IDs don't). –  lserni Sep 23 '12 at 12:43

try this:

-- insert into matchtable -- uncomment to insert the data
select alias1.Id,
    alias1.Name, 
    alias2.Id
    alias2.Name
from objecttable as alias1
    join objecttable as alias2
        on alias1.posx = alias2.posx
            and alias1.posy = alias2.posy
            and alias1.posz = alias2.posz
            and alias1.roty = alias2.roty
            and alias1.roty = alias2.roty
            and alias1.rotz = alias2.rotz
            and alias1.Id > alias2.Id
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Which "tablename" should I replace with the name of which table? I have included the tables' names in the original post, can you edit the solution according to them? –  Funstein Sep 23 '12 at 12:25
    
AFAIK, that won't work. ^_^ You still haven't defined alias1 or alias2. –  hjpotter92 Sep 23 '12 at 12:36
    
sorry, i changed the alias instead of the table name :-) i corrected this –  RomanKonz Sep 23 '12 at 13:52

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