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I researched for a while, hasn't found a CSS solution yet, em and ex units are not correct in this case. What I want is simply a div box that exactly fits 80x25 monospace text. Do I have to resort to Javascript solutions?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

em does work in this case, if you know the proper ratios involved with your font. Try the following HTML:

(The danger with this is that some browsers adjust the font, which can alter the width/height of the font. For 100% accuracy, you might have to go with JavaScript.)

<style type="text/css">
    #text-container {
        border: #f00 solid 1px;
        font: 10px/1.2 Courier, monospace;
        width: 48em;  /* 80 x 0.6 (the width/height ratio of Courier) */
        height: 30em; /* 25 x 1.2 (line-height is 1.2) */
        overflow: hidden;
    }
</style>

<div id="text-container">
00000000001111111111222222222233333333334444444444555555555566666666667777777777
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
</div>
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1  
What if the user have no Courier font? In this case monospace font may have a different width/height ratio. Even the ratio of the same font is not a constant at different scale, try zoom in/out the page. –  btw0 Aug 10 '09 at 15:06
1  
That is not a reliable solution. On my computer you have to make it 49em wide... –  Guffa Aug 10 '09 at 15:07
1  
Yup, as I wrote in my last paragraph this is not a perfect method, but it's the closest you will get using CSS. Courier has different ratios depending on its size, and on top of that some browsers adjust the font to "look better". Fonts have always been hard to measure and this case is not different. Basically, you're best off using JavaScript for this (let the browser render, then measure.) –  Blixt Aug 10 '09 at 15:10
    
That tiny last paragraph after a giant code block is so easy to be overlooked :) –  btw0 Aug 10 '09 at 15:15
    
If you don't hide a paragraph like that below a huge code block, you will of course get downvoted for saying it... ;P –  Guffa Aug 10 '09 at 15:49

Try using the ch unit described in the CSS3 specification:

Equal to the used advance measure of the "0" (ZERO, U+0030) glyph found in the font used to render it.

Thus width: 80ch specifies an 80 character width limit.

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For the height you can use em, but you have to set the line-height also:

height: 25em; line-height: 1em;

Or with a bit more spacing:

height: 30em; line-height: 1.2em;

There is no CSS unit for a character width, so there I am afraid that you need some Javascipt...

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If you know the ratio of a character's height and width, you can set the proper width using ems (it only works with monospace fonts where each character has the same width, though). –  Jason Francis Aug 10 '09 at 14:55
1  
Yes, that would work if you knew the ratio, but you never do. The ratio varies with the actual font used, and how the text is rendered (font smoothing, et.c.). –  Guffa Aug 10 '09 at 15:05

Blixt's response is the correct one, but you can also do this if it makes the math easier:

font-family: Courier; 
font-size: 0.57em;
line-height: 1.2em;
width: 80em; 
height: 30em; /* 1.2 * 25; you could set the line-height at 1em and the box height at 25, 
                 but that would squish things too much */
share|improve this answer
    
Nope. That gives a box that 91x25 on my computer. –  Guffa Aug 10 '09 at 17:30

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