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How can I use an interface or abstract class as an "out" parameter in a method in another interface? Shouldn't I be able to use an interface as an out parameter in another interface, and then have it accept any class that implements that interface when I actually call the method?

I need a Transaction interface that has a method that returns a bool and populates a "Response" object, but that response object is a different derived object for every different implementation of the Transaction interface. Thanks in advance.

namespace csharpsandbox
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TransactionDerived t = new TransactionDerived();
        t.Execute();
    }
}


public interface ITransaction
{
    bool Validate(out IResponse theResponse);
}

public interface IResponse { }



public class ResponseDerived : IResponse
{
    public string message { get; set; }

}

public class TransactionDerived : ITransaction
{
    public bool Validate(out IResponse theResponse) {

        theResponse = new ResponseDerived();
        theResponse.message = "My message";
        return true;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        ResponseDerived myResponse = new ResponseDerived();

        if (Validate(out myResponse))
            Console.WriteLine(myResponse.message);
    }
}
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your current implementation will work as long as you cast things appropriately:

public class TransactionDerived : ITransaction
{
    public bool Validate(out IResponse theResponse)
    {    
        theResponse = new ResponseDerived();
        ((ResponseDerived)theResponse).message = "My message";

        return true;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        IResponse myResponse;

        if (Validate(out myResponse))
            Console.WriteLine(((ResponseDerived)myResponse).message);
    }
}

This is messy, however. You can avoid the casting by using a generic interface instead:

public interface ITransaction<T> where T : IResponse
{
    bool Validate(out T theResponse);
}

public class TransactionDerived : ITransaction<ResponseDerived>
{
    public bool Validate(out ResponseDerived theResponse)
    {    
        theResponse = new ResponseDerived();
        theResponse.message = "My message";

        return true;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        ResponseDerived myResponse;

        if (Validate(out myResponse))
            Console.WriteLine(myResponse.message);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a great solution, will test and make sure it does what I need shortly, thank you! –  ARW Sep 23 '12 at 15:13
    
I just realized this won't quite work because each Transaction implementation can actually have multiple unique Responses... Would my best bet be to cast then? –  ARW Sep 23 '12 at 23:14
    
Without seeing the rest of the system, casting (using the as operator will probably be a little cleaner) sounds like the easiest thing to do. Be careful though, if you find yourself needing to inspect types and cast things a lot, it generally indicates a larger problem in your design. –  verdesmarald Sep 24 '12 at 0:15

The empty interface definition is pointless (See here). Instead, try something like this:

public interface ITransaction
{
    bool Validate(out object theResponse);
} 

and then cast your object appropriately.

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter should comment –  Jeremy Holovacs Sep 23 '12 at 14:44
    
Using this means the consumer of the interface has no contract for the output parameter. How would they know what to expect? –  flem Sep 23 '12 at 14:49
    
By the implementation of the interface. If the interface is of type x, the response is of type y. You'll need to derive that somewhere anyway, since you have to divine the IResponse implementation to call any of its methods or properties. –  Jeremy Holovacs Sep 23 '12 at 14:51
    
Not the DV, but I assume that this is simplified for the sake of example, and the real IResponse interface is non-empty. In any case, this doesn't really explain to the OP how to resolve their issues; "cast your object appropriately" is one solution (the wrong one, I think) but you should give an example, since the OP obviously doesn't know what the appropriate cast is. :) –  verdesmarald Sep 23 '12 at 14:59
    
@verdesmarald, OP doesn't know what form the response will look like at all, that's why he's trying to use an empty interface to box the response object. This is what boxing is for; at some point, he will need to use reflection on the IResponse in order to use it at all. An interface is not the appropriate mechanism here. (see the link in my answer); –  Jeremy Holovacs Sep 23 '12 at 15:03

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