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<?php
if (!isset($_SESSION)) {
        session_start();
}
// anti flood protection
if($_SESSION['last_session_request'] > time() - 2){
        // users will be redirected to this page if it makes requests faster than 2 seconds
        header("location: http://www.example.com/403.html");
        exit;
}
$_SESSION['last_session_request'] = time();
?>

I've already tested this script as you higher the second It Will keep redirecting to http://www.example.com/403.html without any reason.

Can anyone tell me why?

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1  
Debugging tip: echo the variable before the if statement to make sure it is what you think it is. –  sachleen Sep 23 '12 at 15:34
    
Try making your first line just be session_start() without the if statement –  sachleen Sep 23 '12 at 15:36
1  
I've just tested this script - it works perfectly. It doesn't keep on redirecting for myself. –  David Sep 23 '12 at 15:36
    
Well Higher seconds to 8 then it will keep redirecting –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 15:41
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6 Answers

Let's think about this logically for a second...

The attacker's request is already being sent to the web-server and through to the PHP script. The bottle-neck which causes failure in DDoS attacks is the web-server.

The idea behind a DDoS attack is just that - to cause a denial of service, in which the website/server is unable to process any new requests. So in escense, this approach is irrational. You need to go up the ladder of request handling.

If you have a server to your disposal, it's easier. You could simply implement a rate limiting rule on the kernel firewall/iptables. But assuming you do not have access to that, Apache is still at your disposal - although not as efficient.

Implementing a rule within .htaccess is a better solution, but still not perfect. But depending on the DDoS attack, there's no real solution at the developer's disposal to block it.

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then i have my own private server but iptables doesnt limit 6 requests per ip –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 16:09
    
Really? You can implement a rule set that will block x number of requests within x amount of second that have a certain state. See: debian-administration.org/articles/187 –  nand Sep 23 '12 at 16:14
    
By The Way I have Already Tried This . i need to limit requests per ip automaticaly –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 16:23
    
Well there are plenty of articles out there, just google. :) google.com/search?q=rate+limit+with+iptables –  nand Sep 23 '12 at 16:27
    
i have saw as many articles but still having same problem. iptables configured properly though. –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 16:28
show 2 more comments

just change > to <:

<?php        

if (!isset($_SESSION)) {
        session_start();
}
// anti flood protection
if($_SESSION['last_session_request'] < time() - 2){
        // users will be redirected to this page if it makes requests faster than 2 seconds
        header("location: http://www.example.com/403.html");
        exit;
}
$_SESSION['last_session_request'] = time();
?>
share|improve this answer
    
This will redirect the user who make requests slower then 2 seconds. –  xdazz Sep 23 '12 at 15:47
    
now it always redirecting –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 15:48
    
wasn't that the problam at first? –  Dan Barzilay Sep 23 '12 at 15:50
    
i need to redirect user if he made more then 5 requests in 6 seconds –  Unknown3r Sep 23 '12 at 15:50
    
than you will have to save somewhere the time of the first request –  Dan Barzilay Sep 23 '12 at 15:52
show 4 more comments

What spudinksi said still holds true, however here is what your looking for:

 <?php


 if (!isset($_SESSION)) {
         session_start();
 }

 if($_SESSION['last_session_request'] > (time() - 5)){
    if(empty($_SESSION['last_request_count'])){
        $_SESSION['last_request_count'] = 1;
    }elseif($_SESSION['last_request_count'] < 5){
        $_SESSION['last_request_count'] = $_SESSION['last_request_count'] + 1;
    }elseif($_SESSION['last_request_count'] >= 5){
            header("location: http://www.example.com/403.html");
            exit;
         }
 }else{
    $_SESSION['last_request_count'] = 1;
 }

 $_SESSION['last_session_request'] = time();

 ?>
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2  
That won't work. Flooders would just delete cookies –  gladsocc Apr 15 '13 at 10:32
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For stop DDos add a null route for that ip, like this:

route add -host ???.???.???.??? reject
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this code not work for curl looping like this. session will create again on every curl exec;

for ($i=0;$i<999999999999999;$i++){

    /**/
    $c=curl_init();
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_URL,"URL YOU WANT ATTACK");
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_DNS_USE_GLOBAL_CACHE,TRUE);//dns
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_HEADER,0);//get the header
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_CONNECTTIMEOUT ,10);//get the header
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_NOBODY,0);//and *only* get the header
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER,1);//get the response as a string from curl_exec(), rather than echoing it
    curl_setopt($c,CURLOPT_FRESH_CONNECT,1);//don't use a cached version of the url
    curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_USERAGENT, 'Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:11.0) Gecko Firefox/11.0');
    curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER, array('Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded;charset=UTF-8' ));

    echo "\n $i";

}
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There is a script called IOSec, which is quite old, but it might help.

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